Part A: Review on the adaptations of wheat and barley associated with waterlogging resistance/ Part B: Investigating the connection between ethylene and adventitious root growth under waterlogged condition, induced by dissolved starch solution

Cardoso, Victor (2021) Part A: Review on the adaptations of wheat and barley associated with waterlogging resistance/ Part B: Investigating the connection between ethylene and adventitious root growth under waterlogged condition, induced by dissolved starch solution. MRes thesis, University of Nottingham.

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Abstract

Part A:

The effect waterlogged soil can have on plant production is a serious concern for UK wheat and barley farmers. Inhibition of aerobic respiration due to the hypoxic condition of waterlogged soil causes detrimental effects to field crops leading to a loss in yields. Plants can respond to this abiotic stress through regulation of their morphological structure, energy metabolism or via hormonal and signalling adaptations. This review aims to outline the adaptations wheat and barley undertake in morphological structure, respiration, reactive oxygen species damage and plant hormone biosynthesis when subjected to waterlogging stress. Finally, we indicate the areas in which waterlogging research still needs further investigation to better understand waterlogging tolerance in these plant species.

Part B:

Plants display a variety of morphological and structural adaptation to stress survival. These adaptations are varied and differ between species, however, structural adaptations are often seen to be similar across various species. Waterlogged soils cause plants to face hypoxic stress due to the reduction in gas exchange surrounding the root system. This abiotic stress is of growing concern around temperate regions due to the increase in rainfall associated with climate change. A method in which plants adapt to waterlogged soil is via the development of adventitious roots. Adventitious roots are those that develop after prolonged waterlogging and are located around the hypocotyl or stem nodes of plants typically on the surface or directly below the soil surface and help to promote gaseous exchange and nutrient absorption. Under waterlogged stress plants begin to produce large amounts of the plant hormone ethylene, this hormone is associated with regulation of plant growth and senescence, simultaneously it is known that the hormone is connected to environmental stress adaptations. In this case the hormone is connected to adventitious root development. For this project we aim to test the development of adventitious roots on an ethylene insensitive Arabidopsis mutant against (ein2) against the wild type and a mutant with impaired ethylene biosynthesis. Simultaneously we aim to test an innovative protocol using dissolved starch to simulate the hypoxic conditions of waterlogged soils. We take into consideration any and all shortcomings such a protocol may have and aim to assess its viability and suggest further improvements for future research.

Item Type: Thesis (University of Nottingham only) (MRes)
Supervisors: May, Sean
Castellanos Uribe, Marcos
MacGregor, Dana
Keywords: waterlogged soils, wheat, barley, plant roots
Subjects: Q Science > QK Botany > QK710 Plant physiology
S Agriculture > S Agriculture (General)
S Agriculture > SB Plant culture
Faculties/Schools: UK Campuses > Faculty of Science > School of Biosciences
Item ID: 67068
Depositing User: HARDING, Prof Stephen
Date Deposited: 08 Dec 2021 04:40
Last Modified: 08 Dec 2021 04:40
URI: http://eprints.nottingham.ac.uk/id/eprint/67068

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