“We hope as captains of industry to do some good, to use our influence in smoothing the relationships between capital and labour” (Jesse Boot, 1908) Exploring Identity and Corporate Social Responsibility at Boots during the 19th and 20th Centuries.

Crouch, Eleanor Rose (2018) “We hope as captains of industry to do some good, to use our influence in smoothing the relationships between capital and labour” (Jesse Boot, 1908) Exploring Identity and Corporate Social Responsibility at Boots during the 19th and 20th Centuries. [Dissertation (University of Nottingham only)]

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Abstract

This study investigates how individual identity influences organisational identity and internal CSR initiatives. It also explores how CSR can be used as a form of management control over employees. Through the case study of Boots this dissertation will provide an in-depth understanding of the company’s founder, Jesse Boot. It also discusses the three employee welfare initiatives that were implemented during the early 20th century. These include: sports and social activities, education and the new Beeston factory combined with the introduction of the five day working week. During the 1900’s Boots led the way for employee welfare in Britain. Jesse’s unique upbringing led to a strict set of values that moulded both his personality and business style. In turn, this formed the wider organisational identity, shaping the company’s specific beliefs and morals. Through the case study, the dissertation will explore and extend a variety of techniques previously suggested by academics that individuals can engage in to try and sustain their identity. This leads onto how one individual’s identity can shape the collective identity of the organisation. Furthermore, the cleverly chosen and structured CSR programmes at Boots, guided employees to behave in a particular manner, adhering to both Jesse’s and the company’s expectations. This helped the firm to create a morally correct image. Whilst this study contributes to a new area of academic research, as scholars are only just beginning to explore the possible negative side of internal CSR programmes. It also suggests another perspective that requires further research in relation to this theory.

Item Type: Dissertation (University of Nottingham only)
Depositing User: Crouch, Eleanor
Date Deposited: 14 Mar 2022 14:46
Last Modified: 14 Mar 2022 14:46
URI: http://eprints.nottingham.ac.uk/id/eprint/53826

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