Confirmatory Factor Analysis and further validation of the Comprehensive assessment of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy processes (CompACT)

Bayliss, Katrina (2018) Confirmatory Factor Analysis and further validation of the Comprehensive assessment of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy processes (CompACT). DClinPsy thesis, University of Nottingham.

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Abstract

The current research provides further testing and validation of the newly developed Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) measure: Comprehensive assessment of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (CompACT- Francis et al., 2016). To further evaluate the psychometric robustness of the CompACT the current research: (1) completed an intercorrelated and bifactor confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) of the previously identified three-factor structure; (2) retested the psychometric properties (reliability and validity indicators) in an independent sample (n=313); (3) tested the CompACT’s stability over a two-week period (test-retest reliability); and (4) tested the ability to distinguish groups based on clinical screening criteria for distress (CompACT clinical cut-offs). Further testing was then carried out to explore and confirm the construct of the CompACT which included: unidimensional analysis and hierarchical analysis.

Both intercorrelated and bifactor analyses in the main study yielded an acceptable model fit confirming the three-factor structure of the CompACT. Test-retest data (n=112) confirmed stability over a two-week period (r = .88) indicating a large effect. Clinical cut-off data was also analysed, which offered preliminary findings for scores indicative of low psychological flexibility. Regression analysis suggested that scores of 85 and below on the CompACT, within this dataset, were indicative of low psychological flexibility. Further CFA testing suggested that the bifactor model produced the best fitting model overall. However, taking into consideration ACT theoretical conceptualisations and a priori assumptions, it was concluded that the intercorrelated CFA analysis was most representative of the CompACT structure.

This study supports the three-factor model of the CompACT and provides further evidence that it is a useful, reliable, stable and robust tool within the ACT field, for research and clinical practice.

Item Type: Thesis (University of Nottingham only) (DClinPsy)
Supervisors: Golijani-Moghaddam, Nima
Dawson, David
Keywords: Acceptance and commitment therapy, Psychological flexibility, Assessment, Measures, Confirmatory factor analysis
Subjects: W Medicine and related subjects (NLM Classification) > WM Psychiatry
Faculties/Schools: UK Campuses > Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences > School of Medicine
Item ID: 53620
Depositing User: Bayliss, Katrina
Date Deposited: 02 Apr 2019 09:41
Last Modified: 07 May 2020 14:03
URI: http://eprints.nottingham.ac.uk/id/eprint/53620

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