An Investigation into the Use of Attainable Role Models as a Marketing Tool for Motivating Females to Increase Physical Activity

Armitage, Tressa (2018) An Investigation into the Use of Attainable Role Models as a Marketing Tool for Motivating Females to Increase Physical Activity. [Dissertation (University of Nottingham only)]

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Abstract

Physical inactivity is considered a global public health priority which has led to an increasing demand for effective promotion of physical activity participation. Physical inactivity among young females is of particular concern and therefore they are the focus group of this research. Role models, particularly elite sportspeople, are commonly used in marketing campaigns to promote physical activity, despite criticism over their motivational influence. To date there is a lack of experimental work investigating if and if so how, alternative role models such as more attainable role models, could be incorporated into campaigns. This research fills the gap in the literature by examining the potential for role models that are perceived as ‘attainable’ as a marketing tool for motivating inactive females to become active. The paper describes an experiment whereby inactive females are randomly assigned to read a case study about either an attainable or unattainable role model and their experiences of becoming active, or a control group where participants do not read a case study about a role model. Participants’ motivation to become active is then measured to determine if attainable role models can motivate inactive females to become active. Participants’ expectancy of succeeding in becoming active and value attached to becoming active, which are determinants of the motivational influence of role models, are also measured to determine how attainable role models can motivate inactive females to become active. The findings report that participants that read about an attainable role model were the most motivated to become active. This demonstrates that attainable role models can motivate inactive females to become active and are more motivational than unattainable role models. Additionally, participants that read about an attainable role model had the highest expectancy of succeeding and value attached to becoming active. This demonstrates that attainable role models can influence inactive females’ motivation to become active by increasing their expectancy of succeeding and value attached to becoming active. On the basis of these findings, the paper offers strong support for incorporating attainable role models into physical activity campaigns that aim to motivate female physical activity engagement.

Item Type: Dissertation (University of Nottingham only)
Depositing User: Armitage, Tressa
Date Deposited: 24 Jan 2022 17:12
Last Modified: 24 Jan 2022 17:12
URI: http://eprints.nottingham.ac.uk/id/eprint/53618

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