Communicating value to enhance service visualization

Leong, Vai Shiem and Hibbert, Sally and Ennew, Christine (2018) Communicating value to enhance service visualization. Journal of Services Marketing . ISSN 0887-6045 (In Press)

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Abstract

Purpose – This study aims to examine the effects of enhanced visualization of intangible service value through integration of means-end perspectives on advertising effectiveness.

Design/methodology/approach – Banking advertisements, incorporating message stimuli derived from salient values desired by the financial consumers and designed to assist message elaboration and stimulate personal relevance, were developed to examine the influence of cognitive connectivity on vividness of intangible service benefits and service advertising effectiveness.

Findings – The findings demonstrate that greater cognitive connectivity positively affects perceived tangibility, attitude towards the advertisement, and attitude towards the brand. Additionally, the results indicated that perceived personal relevance has higher influence on envisioning service components, compared to one’s ability to connect visual cues to perceived benefits and to immediate end-goals.

Research limitations – This study incorporated visual stimuli limited only to financial security and social recognition. Future research should aim to examine the effects of different type of values on consumers’ elaboration process and their ability to visualize financial services.

Originality/value – This study extends knowledge of the means-end chain by proposing a means-end cognitive connectivity (MECC) construct which influences the degree that consumers are able to mentally picture intangible service attributes. This study also provides insight that different values have different degree of influence on one’s ability to visualize service.

Item Type: Article
RIS ID: https://nottingham-repository.worktribe.com/output/933655
Keywords: Intangibility; Financial services; Values; Visualization strategy; Advertising; Means-end chain
Schools/Departments: University of Nottingham, UK > Faculty of Social Sciences > Nottingham University Business School
Depositing User: Eprints, Support
Date Deposited: 18 Jun 2018 12:01
Last Modified: 04 May 2020 19:37
URI: http://eprints.nottingham.ac.uk/id/eprint/52461

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