Factors affecting the motivation of migrant workers studying ESOL at an FE college: Can motivation and amotivation be predicted and can measures be taken to improve attendance and retention?

Hawkins, Nicholas (2015) Factors affecting the motivation of migrant workers studying ESOL at an FE college: Can motivation and amotivation be predicted and can measures be taken to improve attendance and retention? [Dissertation (University of Nottingham only)]

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Abstract

A modified AMS 28 test was given to advanced and upper-intermediate level ESOL students studying English Language at a Further Education College in the UK. The test measures student motivation and categorises it into six types plus amotivation. It is thought that identifying the type of motivation of the students may enable those with weak or no motivation to be identified and, if necessary, intervention to take place.

It was shown that there was little significant difference in the background of the students who withdrew from the course compared with those who completed, although those students who had been resident in the country for 3-4 years were more likely to withdraw than those resident for either fewer or more years. Students in the cohort were found to be well motivated, and in general had an even balance of extrinsic and intrinsic motivational types. Students who withdrew were, however, more likely to have an extrinsic integrated type of motivation, which may indicate they placed value on the course as a means to getting (or getting better) employment in the UK, and left the course when this goal was achieved. No students in this cohort were amotivated, according to the test.

The low number of students (13.5%) who withdrew from the course is an indication that students found the course of value and is similar to the national average for such courses, although this low number made statistical interpretation of the results difficult.

It would be useful to extend this survey in the future to include students of lower levels who may become demotivated more quickly than the students in the higher levels questioned. It would also be of value to incorporate

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achievement statistics (ie which students obtained or did not obtain a full qualification) at the end of the course and correlate that data with motivation type.

Item Type: Dissertation (University of Nottingham only)
Depositing User: Gigg, Diane
Date Deposited: 11 Dec 2015 13:42
Last Modified: 16 Sep 2016 19:04
URI: http://eprints.nottingham.ac.uk/id/eprint/31053

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