Servants of Globalisation: the case of highly skilled migrant women employed in the medical profession in the UK

Nettleship, Clare (2014) Servants of Globalisation: the case of highly skilled migrant women employed in the medical profession in the UK. [Dissertation (University of Nottingham only)]

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Abstract

This paper seeks to address the dearth in gender focused skilled migration theory. The study aims to obtain a deeper understanding of the highly skilled female migration experiences and motivations of highly skilled migrant women employed within the British healthcare sector and seeks to recommend good practice points for relevant organisations.

This project presents data collected through a series of semi-structured interviews with female highly skilled medical professionals working in independent hospitals and hospices throughout the Midlands and South Yorkshire, UK. Four female migrant doctors and four overseas nurses participated within the research. Subjects originated from four locations: The United States of America, South Africa, The Philippines and India. The cohort consisted a various ethnic backgrounds: one black American, two black-African, one white African and three Asian.

The findings showed that migrants exhibiting markers of difference faced high levels of negative experiences such as racial discrimination, downward mobility and verbal abuse. Overall highly skilled female migrants experienced a cumulative disadvantage. Skilled female migrant motivators included spousal obligations, financial betterment and opportunities for the family.

The report concludes by highlighting the need to address racial discrimination and inequality within the British healthcare sector

Item Type: Dissertation (University of Nottingham only)
Depositing User: Nettleship, Clare
Date Deposited: 23 Dec 2021 13:28
Last Modified: 23 Dec 2021 13:28
URI: http://eprints.nottingham.ac.uk/id/eprint/27953

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