Communication Channels & Employee Engagement: Making sense of, and, giving sense to, corporate social responsibility initiative implementation

mckay, rachael (2014) Communication Channels & Employee Engagement: Making sense of, and, giving sense to, corporate social responsibility initiative implementation. [Dissertation (University of Nottingham only)] (Unpublished)

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Abstract

The motivation of this paper is drawn from corporate social responsibility (CSR) literature becoming increasingly focused on employee engagement as CSR has been identified as a way in which employees can share and live the values of the organization. Understanding that companies are progressively building upon what is existing, and are seeking to optimize their CSR and sustainability programmes, the aim of this paper is to offer a conceptual framework that can help guide practitioners when communicating new or redefined CSR initiatives. Adopting the sensegiving and sensemaking approach, and applying it as an internal communications strategy, the proposed framework, and corresponding research, goes beyond the general aims of traditional implementation campaigns and focuses on the communication efforts unique to each stage and how employees can be engaged throughout this process. Moreover, given the plurality of media choice available today, this framework aims to match media choice to the specific phases of the implementation process. Applying an integrated inductive and deductive approach, this framework is derived from both theoretical and practical perspectives.

Item Type: Dissertation (University of Nottingham only)
Keywords: CSR, Media Choice, Employee Engagement, Internal Communications, Change Management; UK Retail Industry
Depositing User: EP, Services
Date Deposited: 01 Apr 2022 13:57
Last Modified: 01 Apr 2022 13:57
URI: http://eprints.nottingham.ac.uk/id/eprint/27257

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