The development and evaluation of a computer based e-learning tool to enhance knowledge of workplace wellness

Gartshore, Emily (2014) The development and evaluation of a computer based e-learning tool to enhance knowledge of workplace wellness. [Dissertation (University of Nottingham only)] (Unpublished)

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Abstract

Abstract

Introduction: The study is the first to explore the overall workplace wellness knowledge of healthcare staff and students and the use of e-learning to improve this knowledge. Workplace health promotion is an essential part of improving public health, useful for reducing the burden of noncommunicable diseases. However, this emerging topic is not covered in healthcare staff or student education programmes. As no learning tools are available to improve workplace wellness knowledge, this dissertation describes the development and evaluation of an e-learning tool focussing on six workplace wellness topics; work-related stress, musculoskeletal disorders, diet and nutrition, physical activity, smoking and alcohol consumption.

Methods: To develop the e-learning tool the Centre for Excellence in Teaching and Learning in Reusable Learning Objects Agile Development Workflow was followed, using expert peer review and a pilot study to create a high quality learning resource. Once developed, a one-group pre and post-test comparison design was used, testing baseline and post-intervention knowledge of workplace wellness. A knowledge questionnaire was used to collect quantitative accuracy scores and subjective evaluation questions were used to assess participants’ perceptions of usability.

Results: Pre-questionnaire results showed a poor baseline knowledge of workplace wellness across all of the study sample (n=194). A statistically significant

Emily Gartshore vii MNurSci Dissertation: 21/03/2014

improvement in knowledge was seen post-intervention (t(75)=-14.801, p < 0.0005), which also revealed a large effect size. Question specific analysis identified that the percentage of correct responses improved for all questions, identifying the success of the e-learning tool in improving workplace wellness knowledge.

Conclusion: The dissertation gives insight to the poor baseline workplace wellness knowledge of healthcare staff and students. It reveals that the workplace wellness e-learning resource is an effective way to improve knowledge of workplace wellness in healthcare staff and students, with future implications for public health, health education and e-learning.

Item Type: Dissertation (University of Nottingham only)
Depositing User: EP, Services
Date Deposited: 02 Jul 2014 10:21
Last Modified: 20 Nov 2016 09:33
URI: http://eprints.nottingham.ac.uk/id/eprint/27075

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