Registered nurses’ health behaviours and perceptions towards being a role model

Neal, Susan (2012) Registered nurses’ health behaviours and perceptions towards being a role model. [Dissertation (University of Nottingham only)] (Unpublished)

[img] PDF - Registered users only - Requires a PDF viewer such as GSview, Xpdf or Adobe Acrobat Reader
Download (1MB)

Abstract

Objective: To assess a range of health behaviours in registered nurses including physical activity, nutrition, smoking and alcohol consumption. Their perceptions towards being a role model for their patients were also investigated. Comparisons were made between pre and post registration nurses to highlight if this had any difference on health behaviours and their perceptions towards being a role model.

Design: The study involved a quantitative design using a cross sectional questionnaire. A convenience sample was used involving registered nurses from eight directorates within the NHS Trust.

Setting: The study was carried out at a large NHS teaching hospital in the East Midlands.

Method: Questionnaires were placed in staff rooms across the hospital and participants were asked to send the completed questionnaires back to the researcher. Results were then entered into SPSS version 19 for data analysis.

Results: Results showed that almost half of the registered nurses were either overweight or obese. A significant difference was observed between pre and post registration nurses in their perceptions towards being a role model, with pre-registration nurses more likely to agree that nurses should present themselves as role models. Registered nurses were found to be more physically active, to eat more healthily and to drink less alcohol than pre-registration nurses. No significant difference was found between the two groups in smoking prevalence.

Conclusion: Both pre and post registration nurses would benefit from a variety of interventions which promote healthy behaviours. For both groups healthy eating was shown to be an area which needed vast improvements. Ways in which to do this include increased teaching on this issue as well as ensuring that healthy food is available in the areas where nurses’ work and that it is also affordable. Another area which would benefit

from interventions is alcohol consumption, with a high percentage of both pre and post registration nurses being found to participate in what the government terms binge drinking. A possible initiative which could be adopted is workplace wellness schemes which have been shown to be effective in improving the health behaviours of nurses.

Item Type: Dissertation (University of Nottingham only)
Depositing User: EP, Services
Date Deposited: 21 Nov 2013 14:52
Last Modified: 25 Oct 2016 09:47
URI: http://eprints.nottingham.ac.uk/id/eprint/26945

Actions (Archive Staff Only)

Edit View Edit View