A critical review to determine what new and evolving Trauma Systems in England can learn from their mature and established counterparts overseas.

Corbett, Imogen (2012) A critical review to determine what new and evolving Trauma Systems in England can learn from their mature and established counterparts overseas. [Dissertation (University of Nottingham only)] (Unpublished)

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Abstract

Background: Trauma care in England is below the standards of service provision

when compared to many other developed countries. In recent years there has been

an impetus for improvements in trauma care and as a result, Trauma Systems are

beginning to roll out across England to meet the complex needs of trauma patients

and bring the quality of service provision into line with international comparators.

Aim: This review aims to explore the extent to which, new and evolving Trauma

Systems in England, can learn and implement ideas from their mature and

established counterparts overseas to deliver high quality trauma care to severely

injured patients.

Methods: A critical review of the literature has been undertaken and an analytical

framework has been developed to explore and assess the components of an

effective Trauma System.

Findings: After reviewing the literature on Trauma Systems focussing on topics of

patient outcomes, business case and nursing, it was found that systematic

improvements in trauma care occur over time with improvements in system

organisation and structure. Further improvements in Trauma Systems can come

from comprehensive treatment of all triage positive patients within the Trauma

System, additional data collection addressing trauma morbidities and patient

quality of life, service and system evaluation to identify and address inadequacies,

rehabilitation improvements and long term patient follow up, trauma prevention

strategies and facilitation of nurse empowerment and professional development.

Conclusion: The 2012 Framework for Trauma Systems has been developed and

used as an analytical tool to identify the components of an effective Trauma

System. It should be adopted when implementing and assessing effective trauma

systems to ensure that all patient and system needs are addressed. A critical

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review of the literature has been conducted and recommendations for effective

trauma system implementation in England have been made.

Item Type: Dissertation (University of Nottingham only)
Depositing User: EP, Services
Date Deposited: 21 Nov 2013 14:55
Last Modified: 24 Oct 2016 02:08
URI: http://eprints.nottingham.ac.uk/id/eprint/26936

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