Motivations for Chinese and Japanese Young Female Consumers to Purchase Luxury Fashion Products: A Cross-cultural Comparison

YU, ZEQUN (2013) Motivations for Chinese and Japanese Young Female Consumers to Purchase Luxury Fashion Products: A Cross-cultural Comparison. [Dissertation (University of Nottingham only)] (Unpublished)

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Abstract

This dissertation aims to answer two main research questions. First, what are the luxury fashion product purchasing motivations of Chinese and Japanese young female consumers? Second, are there any similarities and differences between Chinese and Japanese in their motivations for buying luxury fashion items?

After reviewing the literature, a general framework combined the work of Veblen (1899), Lebenstein (1950), Vigneron and Johnson (1999, 2004), Wiedmann et al (2007) and other authors has been proposed to generalise the motivation themes discovered by the current research. The framework includes four main motivations in the literature: Functional value, Interpersonal/Social effects, Personal/Individual effects, and the financial value of the luxury products. Through the qualitative method, data was collected by the in-depth interview approach from eight Chinese and eight Japanese young female respondents aged from 24 to 35.

The main motivations identified reflect and support the academic theories in the literature. Respondents from Both China and Japan share four common motivations in purchasing luxury fashion product: for luxuries’ functional values (quality, uniqueness, durability), social effects (conspicuous consumption, prestige value, social group fit in), personal-oriented motivation (self-identity, Hedonic, Materialistic value) and financial value. Chinese people concerned more about the social effects and the brand reputation of luxury fashion branded items, while Japanese consumers seemed to be motivated stronger by their personal preferences, self–image representing and hedonic values.

Furthermore, the research discovers that Chinese and Japanese consumers have their own specific motives and considerations in purchasing luxuries. Chinese consumers would also be motivated by a desire to obtain better working or business opportunities, gain ‘face’ and improve relationships with other people, and enrich their lives through luxury consumption. For Japanese consumers, besides the main motivations, they would also consider whether the luxury brand represents their attitudes towards life, the customer services and the raw material of the product.

Item Type: Dissertation (University of Nottingham only)
Depositing User: EP, Services
Date Deposited: 28 Mar 2014 12:58
Last Modified: 08 Dec 2016 11:39
URI: http://eprints.nottingham.ac.uk/id/eprint/26782

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