Political Bias and Derivatives Regulation - Examining the extent to which political bias, in newspapers, affects attitudes towards derivatives regulation

Efstratopoulos, Panos G. (2011) Political Bias and Derivatives Regulation - Examining the extent to which political bias, in newspapers, affects attitudes towards derivatives regulation. [Dissertation (University of Nottingham only)] (Unpublished)

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Abstract

Abstract



In the wake of the accelerating growth of the derivatives and the global destruction they have caused, politicians and financial market regulators throughout the world have found themselves under pressure to revise and enhance the regulation of derivatives and particularly the Over-the-Counter (“OTC”) derivatives markets.

A plethora of articles have been and are still being written in order to evaluate reform proposals regarding the derivatives market, make policy recommendations or simply express their opinion concerning the derivatives regulation. The purpose of this dissertation is to review articles written, in two newspapers- namely the International Herald Tribune and the Wall Street Journal- of different political bias between the years 2009 and 2011, on the regulation of derivatives, and examine the extent to which political bias affects their attitude towards derivatives regulation. However, it must be stressed that a complete and accurate review of all articles is not possible due its great abundance, and therefore a representative unbiased random sample will be chosen. We will therefore base our attempt on numerous articles and try to identify as best we can the underlying political bias in both newspapers. Furthermore, the paper, as a secondary target aims at shedding light on which regulation method is more widely accepted by both leftist and rightist politically biased individuals and try to answer the debate of which market regulated or unregulated should be preferred, in an attempt to provide helpful information both to lawmakers and the public.

Item Type: Dissertation (University of Nottingham only)
Depositing User: EP, Services
Date Deposited: 09 Apr 2013 08:34
Last Modified: 13 Sep 2016 23:27
URI: http://eprints.nottingham.ac.uk/id/eprint/25402

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