The opportunity of company’s input through social networks sites: Corporate social responsibility communication’s impacts on stakeholders. Case study of Nestlé and The Body Shop.

Le Beller, Marion (2011) The opportunity of company’s input through social networks sites: Corporate social responsibility communication’s impacts on stakeholders. Case study of Nestlé and The Body Shop. [Dissertation (University of Nottingham only)] (Unpublished)

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Abstract

Purpose – Consumers are increasingly concerned about reports of questionable corporate practices. Explaining complex issues like CSR policies and activities is critically important nowadays for companies and arouse a need for exchanges and discussions between firms and stakeholders. The purpose of this dissertation is to show how SNSs pages provide the necessary interactivity for these exchanges and incite phenomenon like voicing. The impact of companies’ inputs on stakeholders’ perceptions and responses to such discussions is also explored as levels of commitment to CSR matters differ and of CSR knowledge vary among participants; so stakeholders may express different concerns and behaviour on SNSs.

Desing/methodology/approach – This paper classifies different types of responses using two frameworks: Mohr et al. (2001) classification of consumer responses to CSR and the Exit/Voice/Loyalty/Neglect (EVLN) framework that classes behavioural responses in relationship. The study takes an exploratory approach by conducting a nethnographic study of a purposive sample of 11 online network groups belonging to two different companies.

Findings – Results indicate that the way companies communicate on CSR through SNSs influence the level of stakeholders’ knowledge and commitment to CSR issues as well as it impact the company’s online image. Different types of SNSs’ participants and associated behaviours are described.

Research limitations/implications – The small-scale of this case study limits the possibilities for generalization. The study need to be broadened to more companies in different industries and to different type of corporate response polices. A qualitative study to evaluate the repartition of the different type of participant and the percentage of enrolled but inactive persons would enrich this perspective.

Practical implications – CSR debates can induce deep and personal involvement. SNSs enable to provide the necessary personal and tailor-made responses required in such situation but have to be carefully elaborate because of their important impact. Frequencies and types of interactions produced on SNSs impact the activity of proactive participants and can regulate their resistance depending on company’s communication strategy and of the type of participant they are facing.

Originality/value – Little attention has been paid to the impact of corporate and stakeholders’ interactions on SNSs especially when it is not about branding but about complex issues like CSR. Taking into account the theory of consumption as voting and the continuing rise in the consideration of ethics among consumers and producers suggests that a further exploration of SNSs impact on stakeholders’ perception of corporate policies would be worthwhile.

Item Type: Dissertation (University of Nottingham only)
Depositing User: EP, Services
Date Deposited: 26 Apr 2012 09:52
Last Modified: 14 Sep 2016 09:18
URI: http://eprints.nottingham.ac.uk/id/eprint/25039

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