Why are NHS staff sickness absence rates higher than other organisations in the public and private sector? A critical review.

Clifton, Helen (2011) Why are NHS staff sickness absence rates higher than other organisations in the public and private sector? A critical review. [Dissertation (University of Nottingham only)] (Unpublished)

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Abstract

Background There has been a great deal of media attention surrounding the amount of sick days that are taken by public sector employees and recently this focus has been on NHS staff. NHS employees take more sickness absence days that than both other public sector and the private sector employees. It is estimated that staff sickness absence costs the NHS £1.7 billion per year as 10.3 million working days are lost.

Aim The aim of the study is to answer the question, Why are NHS staff sickness absence rates higher than in other organisations in both the public and private sector?

Methods This study was carried out as a critical review. A variety of databases were used to access literature. The literature was analysed and evaluated and key themes were drawn.

Summary of findings A number of factors were found to effect NHS staff health and well-being. These factors were found to influence the individual on different levels; at the macro, meso and micro levels.

Conclusion The NHS employs over 1 million individuals and therefore faces many of the health and well-being inequalities that are present across society. Some of the factors combine to potentially distinguish the NHS from other organisations in the public and private sector.

Different occupational groups are likely to experience different health and well-being.

Item Type: Dissertation (University of Nottingham only)
Depositing User: EP, Services
Date Deposited: 05 Aug 2011 13:38
Last Modified: 01 Nov 2016 19:54
URI: http://eprints.nottingham.ac.uk/id/eprint/24800

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