A survey of the influenza vaccination uptake among student nurses: prevalence and predictive factors

Hunt, Charlotte (2011) A survey of the influenza vaccination uptake among student nurses: prevalence and predictive factors. [Dissertation (University of Nottingham only)] (Unpublished)

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Abstract

Background: Influenza is an important cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide, resulting in up to five million deaths annually. Seasonal influenza affects up to 20% of the UK population annually. Vaccination of healthcare professionals has been reported to reduce the morbidity and mortality of patients, yet the uptake of the cost-free vaccination amongst healthcare workers is characteristically less than 25% across Europe. The main reason to reject the vaccination is reported to be a fear of side effects. However, those who accept the vaccination do so to protect themselves. Student nurses are eligible to have the cost-free influenza vaccination, though there is limited literature to suggest the uptake rate within this population.

Aim: To assess the uptake rate, influential characteristics and factors of the seasonal and H1N1 influenza vaccination uptake among student nurses.

Research design: Descriptive, cross-sectional survey.

Methods: A short self-completion questionnaire was delivered to undergraduate student nurses attending MNursSci and BSc/Diploma lectures at the University of Nottingham.

Results: A total of 430 questionnaires were returned, giving a 95.3% response rate. Overall, 27.6% of the respondents reported to have ever had the influenza vaccination. Of this 21.5% have ever had the seasonal influenza vaccination (12.2% have it annually), and 21.5% had the H1N1 influenza vaccination during 2009. Those who had previously had the vaccination were more likely to have the 2010/2011-winter season vaccination (p=<0.001), although only 19.8% of respondents intended to have this vaccination. Those who have previously suffered with the illness were also more likely to have the vaccination.

Conclusions: There was a low overall uptake of the influenza vaccination among student nurses, and few influential factors increased the uptake rate. The main reported reason rejecting the vaccination was the perception that it was unneeded. However, an increase in information and education could substantially increase this uptake.

Item Type: Dissertation (University of Nottingham only)
Depositing User: EP, Services
Date Deposited: 04 Aug 2011 11:03
Last Modified: 07 Dec 2016 04:33
URI: http://eprints.nottingham.ac.uk/id/eprint/24783

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