HIV and Aids in different countries – qualitative or quantitative

Dickens, Rebecca (2010) HIV and Aids in different countries – qualitative or quantitative. [Dissertation (University of Nottingham only)] (Unpublished)

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Abstract

Abstract

Background: HIV is a global pandemic, affecting the lives of millions, hitting sub-Saharan Africa the worst. Young women in sub-Saharan Africa are particularly vulnerable to HIV, frequently experiencing lack of power in relationships and engaging in transactional sex. Good HIV services are essential to test, treat, care and support HIV+ clients.

Aim: To evaluate the care young HIV+ women experience in a rural Ugandan HIV clinic.

Methods: A qualitative approach was selected and in-depth semi-structured interviews were conducted with ten HIV+ women aged 18-24. Observations of the clinic and informal discussions with staff were also used.

Findings: The majority of young women are satisfied with the service and care they receive from the clinic. Specifically, the testing process is reported to be of high-quality with rapid testing and in-depth counselling. The clinic was found to be in an ideal location for maximum access. Young women seemed to manage their treatments well, with the support and encouragement of staff and regular health talks, although frequent drug shortages hindered their efforts. Staff were found to have positive attitudes with the occasional exception. The women suffered from stigma but often found support within their families and the clinic staff. Home visits and the drama group were found to be useful to those who came into contact with them.

Conclusion: Findings have suggested that care given by the clinic is very good on the whole, especially the VCT process and the support and counselling provided by nurses, doctors and counsellors. Recommendations include ensuring staff attitudes are always positive, and expanding existing services, through malnutrition care, home visits, support groups, and drama groups. However, it is recognised that the capacity of the clinic to respond to most of the recommendations will be limited by financial constraints.

Item Type: Dissertation (University of Nottingham only)
Depositing User: EP, Services
Date Deposited: 01 Feb 2011 09:52
Last Modified: 04 Dec 2016 21:30
URI: http://eprints.nottingham.ac.uk/id/eprint/23625

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