Why do many parents currently feel compelled to immunise their children in the UK? : A Critical Review

Tyson, Rachael (2010) Why do many parents currently feel compelled to immunise their children in the UK? : A Critical Review. [Dissertation (University of Nottingham only)] (Unpublished)

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Abstract

Abstract

Background: Immunisation is one of the most important public health interventions that has had the greatest impact on global health, particularly amongst the infant population, (WHO, 2009). In the United Kingdom immunisation is voluntary and a high level of uptake for childhood immunisations is achieved, this is however threatened by vaccine controversy. Parents often find their immunisation decision difficult and there are some inadequacies in the current system of support, therefore a review of the decision-making process considering the influences on parents’ vaccination choice is required.

Methods: A critical review was carried out; literature searches were conducted using the databases CINHAL, EMBASE and ScienceDirect (Elsevier). The search criteria were ‘childhood immunisation’ AND ‘vaccination decisions’ AND ‘united kingdom.’ Manuel searches of the reference lists of appropriate papers returned more relevant literature. The review tools; Greenhalgh’s criteria for evaluating qualitative research papers (1997) and Crombie’s the pocket guide to critical appraisal (2003) were used to assess the quality of the papers included. The papers were thematically analysed.

Results: Three main themes concerning the determinants of a vaccination decision arose from the literature; the impact of public health information provision, health professional support and parents own personal opinions and beliefs. Furthermore a decision of vaccination acceptance did not necessarily reflect an informed decision.

Conclusions: Parents have unmet support and information needs which impede an informed decision. Vaccine controversy intensifies the difficult decision parents face, trust is an issue of great importance in which vaccination decisions depend. Parents experience some pressure to accept childhood immunisation. Parental concerns are genuine and must be respected as such, this might require a new approach to the exchange and delivery of immunisation information, the role of health professionals in the community are integral to this.

Item Type: Dissertation (University of Nottingham only)
Depositing User: EP, Services
Date Deposited: 01 Feb 2011 09:53
Last Modified: 17 Nov 2016 23:21
URI: http://eprints.nottingham.ac.uk/id/eprint/23623

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