A Critical Review into the Socioeconomic Issues Surrounding the Human Papillomavirus Vaccine

Rowlands, Laura (2010) A Critical Review into the Socioeconomic Issues Surrounding the Human Papillomavirus Vaccine. [Dissertation (University of Nottingham only)] (Unpublished)

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Abstract

ABSTRACT

A critical review of the literature was sought to answer the research question:

“What is the current position of evidence behind the recommendations for the HPV vaccination programme and the consequent socioeconomic implications?”

Cervical cancer is a significant disease burden with alarming morbidity and mortality rates worldwide despite being preventable by vaccination against its oncogenic prerequisite, HPV. Prophylactic vaccinations have been developed and their efficacy proven. The target population eligible for vaccination in the UK consists of girls aged 12-13, with a catch-up campaign for girls up to age 18.

Inequalities have arisen as a consequence of the chosen target group. Social implications include: perceived sexism and ageism; ethical issues in consenting and vaccinating minors against STI; legal concerns relating to the age for consensual sex. Furthermore moral, religious, medical and political opinions add to this heated debate. A solution to overcoming such inequalities is to expand the target population. This raises the issue of cost-effectiveness.

Cost-effectiveness is dependent on a variety of factors affecting the vaccination programme: choice of vaccine; incorporating males; optimal female age range etc. It invites comparisons of other healthcare systems and consideration of standards of care. The decision not to vaccinate a wider margin of the population appears to have little to do with a reduction of cost-effectiveness and more to do with rationing of a cost-limited programme that reflects NHS under funding.

Suggestions to overcome such problems within the vaccination programme include a shift in funding away from the cervical screening programme, the cost-effectiveness of which may be expected to decrease as a result of the success of HPV vaccination. Another suggestion for improvement involves combining health education with the vaccination programme, a role for trained nurses, rather than relying on the media as the major source of information.

Item Type: Dissertation (University of Nottingham only)
Depositing User: EP, Services
Date Deposited: 01 Feb 2011 09:54
Last Modified: 06 Apr 2016 15:49
URI: http://eprints.nottingham.ac.uk/id/eprint/23619

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