How confident are community nurses in caring for patients who are dying? A qualitative study of community nurses’ experience’s of providing end of life care in the community

Adams, Katherine (2010) How confident are community nurses in caring for patients who are dying? A qualitative study of community nurses’ experience’s of providing end of life care in the community. [Dissertation (University of Nottingham only)] (Unpublished)

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Abstract

Abstract

Aim

The purpose of this study was to explore how confident community nurses are in providing end of life care in the community.

Background

The amount of palliative care being provided in the community is growing as more patients are deciding to die at home. Community nurses are the community professionals who are taking on the primary role of caring for these patients. Literature has considered the experiences of this population (Wilkes and Beale, 2001; Rose and Glass, 2006; Seale, 1992); however, there is little that addresses how confident community nurses are in providing this care.

Method

Ten semi-structured interviews were completed with community nurses involved in palliative care, utilising an interpretive phenomenological approach. The interviews were recorded and subsequently analysed using Giorgi’s framework of analysis (1985).

Findings

The five main theme categories that were identified were confidence, providing palliative care, experience, training and support. Although forming separate categories, the themes were also interwoven, forming a complex picture of the confidence of community nurses.

Conclusions

The picture that the community nurses presented was of confidence being a complex layered phenomenon. Professionally, they appeared confident in their role. Behind this, however, they were less confident in certain aspects of the work and their ability to provide the care. It was seen as possible to increase confidence, largely through experience of the role and mentoring through practice. Training was also seen to be important, but not as significant as is presented in recent policies and strategies. Central to growing in confidence and maintaining confidence was a support network, comprising of organisational structures as well as interpersonal relationships with colleagues and the wider community team.

Item Type: Dissertation (University of Nottingham only)
Depositing User: EP, Services
Date Deposited: 01 Feb 2011 09:52
Last Modified: 10 Dec 2016 06:10
URI: http://eprints.nottingham.ac.uk/id/eprint/23617

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