A Qualitative Research Study Exploring Young Peoples Experiences of Renal Replacement Therapy.

Wells, Francesca (2010) A Qualitative Research Study Exploring Young Peoples Experiences of Renal Replacement Therapy. [Dissertation (University of Nottingham only)] (Unpublished)

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Abstract

Abstract

Background: Renal replacement therapy (RRT) transforms life prospects of young people (YP) with Established Renal Failure (ERF). However, these treatments have significant physiological and psychological implications for adolescents who are traditionally developing their autonomy and identity as they prepare to transition into adulthood. Policy emphasises YP’s active participation and consultation as users of health services, yet studies infrequently seek their experiences directly.

Aim: To explore adolescents’ experiences of RRT.

Methods: Adolescents undergoing RRT in a large UK teaching hospital took photographs illustrating the personal impact of their condition and treatment. Qualitative photo elicitation interviews were conducted to explore the significance of the images. Interviews were analysed using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis.

Findings: Ten young people aged 13-17 participated. Health was prioritised over body image, contrary to traditional concerns of young people. Participants demonstrated great emotional resilience, despite finding treatments challenging and experiencing significant impact on relationships and daily routines.

Conclusions: YP engaged readily with the research, and frankly described the impact of RRT on their everyday lives. Service providers must ensure that adolescents’ developmental needs are met as traditional tasks of adolescence may lose priority. However, it is also clear that YP’s ability to cope with treatments should not be underestimated.

Item Type: Dissertation (University of Nottingham only)
Depositing User: EP, Services
Date Deposited: 01 Feb 2011 09:54
Last Modified: 09 Dec 2016 12:06
URI: http://eprints.nottingham.ac.uk/id/eprint/23613

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