Spirituality in Nursing

Stone, Elizabeth (2010) Spirituality in Nursing. [Dissertation (University of Nottingham only)] (Unpublished)

[img] PDF - Registered users only - Requires a PDF viewer such as GSview, Xpdf or Adobe Acrobat Reader
Download (39kB)
[img]
Preview
PDF - Requires a PDF viewer such as GSview, Xpdf or Adobe Acrobat Reader
Download (506kB) | Preview
[img]
Preview
PDF - Requires a PDF viewer such as GSview, Xpdf or Adobe Acrobat Reader
Download (35kB) | Preview
[img]
Preview
PDF - Requires a PDF viewer such as GSview, Xpdf or Adobe Acrobat Reader
Download (33kB) | Preview
[img]
Preview
PDF - Requires a PDF viewer such as GSview, Xpdf or Adobe Acrobat Reader
Download (33kB) | Preview

Abstract

Abstract

Aims: This dissertation examines currently available UK literature on spirituality in nursing, explores which theory of spirituality (found within the pool of literature used this dissertation) is being applied to current nursing practice, and discusses the merits of the various theories of spirituality found within the nursing literature in the application of nursing care within the NHS.

Background: Both spirituality in nursing, and spiritual care within nursing, have recently become points of contention within both the academic world of nursing and within the public eye, partly due to the case of Caroline Petrie. This focus on these issues has generated interest in the ongoing debate surrounding spirituality and its place in nursing care.

Method: A critical review of appropriate literature was undertaken. A summary of the points found within the current debate within the field of spirituality in nursing has been produced.

Conclusions: This work concludes that while the NHS may state that spiritual care is one of its key standards alongside patient dignity, in order that spiritual care be included an absolute working definition based on evidence needs to be found. Until this definition and sufficient supporting evidence is identified, the subjective nature of spirituality creates issues for the provision of nursing care. As such, spirituality should only be considered as part of other care criteria such as those put forward under holistic care models.

Relevance to nursing and clinical practice: While there is debate on the relevance of spirituality to nursing care and practice throughout all of the literature found and used within this dissertation the relevance of spirituality to individuals is not discounted. As such spirituality can be said to have relevance to individuals and must be assessed each individual's needs at the current time, it is currently carried out using holistic assessments.

Item Type: Dissertation (University of Nottingham only)
Depositing User: EP, Services
Date Deposited: 01 Feb 2011 09:53
Last Modified: 09 Dec 2016 04:04
URI: http://eprints.nottingham.ac.uk/id/eprint/23610

Actions (Archive Staff Only)

Edit View Edit View