Translating Scope 3 emissions into the Supply Chain: Exploring the Data Demand for Current Carbon Disclosure Indicators from Procurement and Carbon Decision Makers within the Utilities Sector.

Thomas, Carly (2009) Translating Scope 3 emissions into the Supply Chain: Exploring the Data Demand for Current Carbon Disclosure Indicators from Procurement and Carbon Decision Makers within the Utilities Sector. [Dissertation (University of Nottingham only)] (Unpublished)

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Abstract

Summary

This is an exploratory study working with Achilles and their CarbonReduction© steering group in defining the interface between current procurement carbon data demand and the suggested indicators supplied by the CDP, Defra and Achilles themselves.

Interviews have been carried out within the Achilles Steering Group consisting of 6 major utilities companies surrounding their data demand for carbon emission performance. Through case analysis and analysis of secondary data, a constructed framework has been tested and modified; the new framework takes into account the infancy of supply chain reporting as an institution. Data demand clearly requires an information pathway, and it has been found that the data supply is not sufficient presently for carbon to be reliably integrated into the decision making process. A process of internalising expectations of both internal management (who are the primary internal drivers in measuring supply chain emissions) and suppliers (who are not on the whole reporting carbon emissions as yet) is being managed through demand for qualitative data. Through asking for statements of intent in carbon reduction, an inter-organisational learning process can grant legitimacy to those areas that are working within carbon and procurement activities.

Comparability is an aspirational driver that cannot not be achieved until the emissions data from suppliers is significantly greater in quantity and quality. Comparability is associated with quantitative data, only to be used in the near future through a project of commensuration (Kolk 2008) of current qualitative responses. Appropriate quantitative indicators should be incorporated once the organisational learning process is complete and data demand is equal to data supply. This study outlines the definitions of these appropriate quantitative indicators relevant to procurement. Factors that mediate both data demand and data supply and thus the adoption of supply chain reporting as an institution have also been identified.

Item Type: Dissertation (University of Nottingham only)
Depositing User: EP, Services
Date Deposited: 02 Jun 2011 15:32
Last Modified: 22 Oct 2016 20:11
URI: http://eprints.nottingham.ac.uk/id/eprint/23169

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