‘Sharing the journey’: A qualitative research study investigating the perceptions of mental health nurses working in ‘early intervention in psychosis’ services

Lees, Rachel (2009) ‘Sharing the journey’: A qualitative research study investigating the perceptions of mental health nurses working in ‘early intervention in psychosis’ services. [Dissertation (University of Nottingham only)] (Unpublished)

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Abstract

The ‘early intervention in psychosis’ (EIP) service provides care for individuals experiencing psychosis for the first time who may experience distress whilst accessing mental health services. Literature suggests that therapeutic relationships and engagement may reduce the impact of these events on the individual. This research aimed to explore nurses’ perceptions of how individuals experiencing early psychosis access early intervention in psychosis services and also how service users’ experiences of access may affect future engagement and treatment.

Semi-structured interviews were conducted with eleven community psychiatric nurses working within EIP teams in a healthcare Trust in the East Midlands. Two phases of access were identified. The first phase was affected by factors which influenced the individuals’ capacity for coping with psychosis, their level of insight into their condition and their perceptions of what mental health services were and how they could help. The second phase was found to be affected by service issues, as referral agents may have difficulties in detecting and recognising psychosis and knowing how and where to refer individuals exhibiting symptoms of psychosis. Engagement was perceived as being very closely interlinked with access; access is a precursor to engagement and thus engagement could be seen as an extension of the process by which an individual makes contact and connects with the service and its workers. The issues affecting initial access were therefore also factors which impacted on engagement; including public perceptions of psychosis and mental health services and personal perceptions of mental health and services. Engagement needs to be person-centred and can be achieved even following distressing experiences of access. These findings may have implications for mental health nurses working within any mental health service as engagement is integral to the nurses’ role and they might encounter people who can be referred to the EIP service.

Item Type: Dissertation (University of Nottingham only)
Depositing User: EP, Services
Date Deposited: 07 Sep 2009 08:42
Last Modified: 23 Oct 2016 08:27
URI: http://eprints.nottingham.ac.uk/id/eprint/22821

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