A systematic review into the use of superficial heat and cold applications in the management of non-malignant, non-procedural pain in older adults.

Hannabus, Stephanie (2009) A systematic review into the use of superficial heat and cold applications in the management of non-malignant, non-procedural pain in older adults. [Dissertation (University of Nottingham only)] (Unpublished)

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Abstract

Background

Hot and cold treatments are an example of simple, inexpensive techniques that can be easily utilised to manage pain. Despite recommendations for the use of hot and cold modalities in the treatment of pain there is little and conflicting empirical evidence to support this. There is a need to summarise the available literature in this area.

Aim

To systematically review the use of superficially administered heat and cold therapy in the management of non-malignant, non-procedural pain in older adults (>65 years), and to assess the evidence base for their use.

Search Strategy

Five databases were searched; Allied and Complementary Medicine( 1985 - February 2009), British Nursing Index and Archive (1985 - February 2009), CINAHL with Full Text (1984 – 2009), EMBASE (1980 - 2009 Week 05) and Ovid MEDLINE (1950 - February Week 1 2009). The reference list of all obtained articles were also hand searched.

Enlgish language, quantative and qualitiative research and sources of narrative opinion and text addressing those aged 65 years old and over, with non-malignant, non-procedural pain were, included in the review. Any form of superficially administered, hot and cold treatments was considered.

Critical appraisal and data extraction was performed by the author with predetermined tools.

Results

Nineteen pieces of literature are included in the review; four studies and fifteen pieces of narrative opinion and text.

Conclusions

There is lack of empirical research into the effect of superficial heat and cold applications in the management of non-malignant, non-procedural pain in older adults. The current evidence base primarily consists of narrative opinion and text and poorly conducted studies.

The findings of the review suggest that hot and cold modalities are thought to be effective adjuncts in the treatment of pain in older adults; however, there is little empirical evidence to support this.

Item Type: Dissertation (University of Nottingham only)
Depositing User: EP, Services
Date Deposited: 20 Aug 2009 09:55
Last Modified: 17 Sep 2016 02:39
URI: http://eprints.nottingham.ac.uk/id/eprint/22721

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