A secondary analysis to understand the views and perceptions of what older people consider constitutes a 'good death'

Winfield, Hannah (2009) A secondary analysis to understand the views and perceptions of what older people consider constitutes a 'good death'. [Dissertation (University of Nottingham only)] (Unpublished)

[img] PDF - Registered users only - Requires a PDF viewer such as GSview, Xpdf or Adobe Acrobat Reader
Download (504kB)

Abstract

The ageing of populations is the current demographic trend. Death now most commonly occurs within older age, and yet there remains a deficiency of research involving those for whom this experience affects most; older people.

To further understand the views and perceptions of what older people consider to constitute a ‘good death’ a secondary analysis on a purposive sample of ten interviews involving eleven participants from an existing qualitative data set was conducted.

Through the process of ‘open coding’, analysis of the interviews identified the following themes as significant in constituting a ‘good death’. Home was identified as the preferred setting for death, though this was always contingent upon the consequences this had for their family or close friends. Consideration of family and significant others was of utmost importance, in creating a good death, even to the extent that the preferences of the participant could be changed by them. Establishing a good relationship with health care professionals through which communication is readily facilitated was an overarching element in the provision of a good death. Management of pain, the use of sedation and whether life prolonging technologies were provided were all further significant issues requiring attention on an individual basis.

One could draw parallels between the elements identified to constitute a good death by the participants in this study and those incorporated in the recently produced end of life care pathway (DoH, 2008). The elements were therefore discussed in conjunction with the policy and wider literature.

Several implications for nursing practice, policy, education and research are identified. The need for further rigorous research with larger sample sizes involving older people is called for. Furthermore, raised awareness of nurses to the elements identified here as being significant to a ‘good death’ for older people could be used to guide current practice.

Item Type: Dissertation (University of Nottingham only)
Depositing User: EP, Services
Date Deposited: 20 Aug 2009 09:17
Last Modified: 24 Oct 2016 07:41
URI: http://eprints.nottingham.ac.uk/id/eprint/22717

Actions (Archive Staff Only)

Edit View Edit View