Explorative Investigation into the Drivers of Firm Failure

Loong, James Seng Wai (2007) Explorative Investigation into the Drivers of Firm Failure. [Dissertation (University of Nottingham only)] (Unpublished)

[img] PDF - Registered users only - Requires a PDF viewer such as GSview, Xpdf or Adobe Acrobat Reader
Download (157kB)

Abstract

A simple fact of life is that firms fail everyday. Although some sporadic literature exists that begins to delve into the subject, there is very little current research dedicated to finding out how and why these organisations are failing and almost no research conducted about the potential remedies that would prevent them from doing so in future. What is known about firm failure indicates that the drivers of failure are not necessarily the opposites of the drivers for success, but what is not known about failure is immense.

With this gap in the research, it is necessary to first identify the drivers of failure and then to define all the key concepts before further investigations can be undertaken. A review of the literature written on failure can then be used to develop a conceptual model to observe how the elements affect each other, and more importantly, firm performance. Realistic aspects will be provided in the form of a case study to provide constructive and practical implications for various stakeholder groups and as such, a discussion of the methodologies used to gather the data will be included for scientific rigour. Analysis of the evidence can then be used as a criteria for evaluating whether the theory and propositions formulated about the drivers of failure were valid. Finally, the general conclusions inferred from the research will be discussed, with potential avenues for further research presented.

Item Type: Dissertation (University of Nottingham only)
Keywords: Firm Failure
Depositing User: EP, Services
Date Deposited: 10 Mar 2008
Last Modified: 27 Sep 2016 05:17
URI: http://eprints.nottingham.ac.uk/id/eprint/21101

Actions (Archive Staff Only)

Edit View Edit View