Mathematical modelling of carbon dioxide dissolution and reaction processes

Mitchell, Mark J. (2012) Mathematical modelling of carbon dioxide dissolution and reaction processes. PhD thesis, University of Nottingham.

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Abstract

Carbon dioxide dissolution into water is a ubiquitous chemical process on earth, and having a full understanding of this process is becoming ever more important as we seek to understand the consequences of 250 years of exponentially-increasing anthropogenic C02 emissions to the atmosphere since the start of the Industrial Revolution. We examine the dissolution of C02 into water in a number of contexts.

First, we analyse what happens to a range of chemical species dissolved in water following an injection of additional C02. We consider the well-mixed problem, and use the method of matched asymptotic expansions to obtain new expressions for the changes in the species' concentrations with time, the new final chemical equilibrium, and the time scales over which this equilibrium is reached, as functions of time, the parameters and the initial condition. These results can be used to help predict the changes in the pH and concentrations of dissolved carbonic species that will occur in the oceans as a result of anthropogenic C02 emissions, and in saline aquifer formations after pumping C02 deep underground.

Second, we consider what happens deep underground in a saline aquifer when C02 has been pumped in, spreads through the pore space, and dissolves into the resident water, when advection, diffusion, and chemical reaction have varying levels of relative importance. We examine the length scales over which the dissolved C02 will spread out through an individual pore, ahead of a spreading drop of C02, and the concentrations of the different chemical species within the pore, in the steady-state case. Finally, some experiments have been carried out to investigate the effect of an injection of gaseous C02 on the chemical composition and pH of a saturated limestone aquifer formation. As the C02 enters the soil, it dissolves into the water, and we model the changes in the chemical composition of the water/limestone mixture with time.

Item Type: Thesis (University of Nottingham only) (PhD)
Supervisors: Cliffe, K.A.
Jensen, O.E.
Marato-Valer, M.
Subjects: Q Science > QA Mathematics > QA273 Probabilities
Faculties/Schools: UK Campuses > Faculty of Science > School of Mathematical Sciences
Item ID: 14502
Depositing User: EP, Services
Date Deposited: 27 Aug 2014 10:57
Last Modified: 26 Oct 2016 13:51
URI: http://eprints.nottingham.ac.uk/id/eprint/14502

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