When “happy” means “sad”: neuropsychological evidence for the right prefrontal cortex contribution to executive semantic processing

Samson, Dana and Connolly, Catherine and Humphreys, Glyn W. (2007) When “happy” means “sad”: neuropsychological evidence for the right prefrontal cortex contribution to executive semantic processing. Neuropsychologia, 45 (5). pp. 896-904. ISSN 0028-3932

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Abstract

The contribution of the left inferior prefrontal cortex in semantic processing has been widely investigated in the last decade. Converging evidence from functional imaging studies shows that this region is involved in the “executive” or “controlled” aspects of semantic processing. In this study, we report a single case study of a patient, PW, with damage to the right prefrontal and temporal cortices following stroke. PW showed a problem in executive control of semantic processing, where he could not easily override automatic but irrelevant semantic processing. This case thus shows the necessary role of the right inferior prefrontal cortex in executive semantic processing. Compared to tasks previously used in the literature, our tasks placed higher demands on executive semantic processing. We suggest that the right inferior prefrontal cortex is recruited when the demands on executive semantic processing are particularly high.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: prefrontal cortex; right hemisphere; semantic processing; executive function; selection
Schools/Departments: University of Nottingham UK Campus > Faculty of Science > School of Psychology
Depositing User: Samson, Dr Dana
Date Deposited: 15 Aug 2008 13:30
Last Modified: 15 Aug 2008 13:30
URI: http://eprints.nottingham.ac.uk/id/eprint/918

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