Transcriptional analysis of adipose tissue during development reveals depot-specific responsiveness to maternal dietary supplementation

Fainberg, Hernan P. and Birtwistle, Mark and Alagal, Reham and Alhaddad, Ahmad and Pope, Mark and Davies, Graeme and Woods, Rachel and Castellanos, Marcos and May, Sean T. and Ortori, Catharine A. and Barrett, David A. and Perry, Viv and Wiens, Frank and Stahl, Bernd and van der Beek, Eline and Sacks, Harold and Budge, Helen and Symonds, Michael E. (2018) Transcriptional analysis of adipose tissue during development reveals depot-specific responsiveness to maternal dietary supplementation. Scientific Reports, 8 (1). 96258/1-96258/11. ISSN 2045-2322

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Abstract

Brown adipose tissue (BAT) undergoes pronounced changes after birth coincident with the loss of the BAT-specifc uncoupling protein (UCP)1 and rapid fat growth. The extent to which this adaptation may vary between anatomical locations remains unknown, or whether the process is sensitive to maternal dietary supplementation. We, therefore, conducted a data mining based study on the major fat depots (i.e. epicardial, perirenal, sternal (which possess UCP1 at 7 days), subcutaneous and omental) (that do not possess UCP1) of young sheep during the frst month of life. Initially we determined what effect adding 3% canola oil to the maternal diet has on mitochondrial protein abundance in those depots which possessed UCP1. This demonstrated that maternal dietary supplementation delayed the loss of mitochondrial proteins, with the amount of cytochrome C actually being increased. Using machine learning algorithms followed by weighted gene co-expression network analysis, we demonstrated that each depot could be segregated into a unique and concise set of modules containing co-expressed genes involved in adipose function. Finally using lipidomic analysis following the maternal dietary intervention, we confrmed the perirenal depot to be most responsive. These insights point at new research avenues for examining interventions to modulate fat development in early life.

Item Type: Article
Schools/Departments: University of Nottingham, UK > Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences > School of Medicine > Division of Child Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology
University of Nottingham, UK > Faculty of Science > School of Biosciences
University of Nottingham, UK > Faculty of Science > School of Pharmacy
Identification Number: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-018-27376-3
Depositing User: Eprints, Support
Date Deposited: 28 Aug 2018 08:55
Last Modified: 28 Aug 2018 08:55
URI: http://eprints.nottingham.ac.uk/id/eprint/53397

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