Evaluation of a "flipped" classroom model within a pharmacy professional practice class: a comparison across three consecutive cohorts

Naik, P. and Balashanker, S. and Emtage, A. and Boyd, M.J. (2017) Evaluation of a "flipped" classroom model within a pharmacy professional practice class: a comparison across three consecutive cohorts. In: Pharmacy Education Conference 2017, 26 June 2017, Manchester, UK.

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Abstract

Background: The “flipped” classroom model promotes student responsibility for learning and increased one-on-one interaction with the instructor (Bergmann & Sams, 2012) allowing classroom time to be maximised for more complex activities. This model was first implemented during the Professional Practice (dispensing) classes of the M.Pharm programme at the University of Nottingham in September 2014.

Aims: To investigate student performance across three consecutive cohorts at the Malaysia campus, one before and two after the implementation of the “flipped” classroom model.

Method: Students’ performance for one particular practical each during the 2nd and 1styear of the programme was retrospectively analysed. Average exercises completed per student, percentage who completed a complex exercise requiring role-play, and percentage making a particular serious error were monitored. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics. Ethical approval was secured from the Science & Engineering Research Ethics Committee of the university.

Results: Average exercises completed during the 2ndyear practical significantly (

p<0.01) increased from 5.44 (±1.31) prior to implementation to 6.47 (±1.95) and 6.23 (±2.15) during the 1st and 2nd year of implementation respectively. Percentage who completed complex exercises increased from 67.0% to 79.6% and 77.7% respectively. Average exercises completed during the 1st year practical significantly decreased (p<0.01) from 7.57 (±0.79) prior to implementation to 5.86 (±1.74) and 6.62 (±1.63) during the 1st and 2nd year of implementation respectively. Percentage of students making a serious error dropped from 39.3% to 19.7% and 28.4% respectively.

Conclusion: The increase in complex exercises completed suggests this model allows students to cover more material at greater depth. The fewer serious errors made suggests that prior preparation allows students to progress faster. The reduction in total output among 1st year students, however, could be because when simpler exercises are involved, students’ ability to manage time effectively in class is adversely affected with prior knowledge of the class exercises. Further studies to assess students’ performance in later years of the programme will be valuable to fully appreciate the outcome of this model.

Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)
Schools/Departments: University of Nottingham, UK > Faculty of Science > School of Pharmacy
Depositing User: Eprints, Support
Date Deposited: 25 Jun 2018 14:05
Last Modified: 08 May 2020 13:00
URI: http://eprints.nottingham.ac.uk/id/eprint/52595

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