Demonstration of differences in colonic volumes, transit, chyme consistency and response to psyllium between healthy and constipated subjects using magnetic resonance imaging

Major, Giles and Murray, Kathryn and Singh, Gulzar and Nowak, Adam and Hoad, Caroline L. and Marciani, Luca and Silos-Santiago, ada and Kurtz, Caroline B. and Johnston, Jeffrey and Gowland, Penny and Spiller, Robin C. (2018) Demonstration of differences in colonic volumes, transit, chyme consistency and response to psyllium between healthy and constipated subjects using magnetic resonance imaging. Neurogastroenterology and Motility . ISSN 1365-2982 (In Press)

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Abstract

Background: In functional gastrointestinal disorders a lack of objective biomarkers limits evaluation of underlying mechanisms. We aimed to demonstrate the utility of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) for this task using psyllium, an effective constipation treatment, in patients and controls.

Methods: Two crossover studies: 1) adults without constipation (controls, n=9) took three treatments in randomised order for 6 days - maltodextrin (placebo), psyllium 3.5g t.d.s and 7g t.d.s.; 2) adults with chronic constipation (patients, n=20) took placebo and psyllium 7g t.d.s. for 6 days. MRI was performed fasting and postprandially on day 6. Measurements included small bowel and ascending colon water content, colonic volume, transit time and MR relaxometry (T1, T2) to assess colonic chyme. Stool water percentage was measured.

Results: 7g psyllium t.d.s. increased fasting colonic volumes in controls from median 372mL (IQR 284-601) to 578 mL (IQR 510-882), and in patients from median 831mL (IQR 745–934) to 1104mL (847–1316), P<0.05). Mean postprandial small bowel water was higher in controls and patients after 7g psyllium t.d.s. vs. placebo. Whole gut transit was slower in patients than controls (P <0.05). T1 of the descending colon chyme (fasting) was lower in patients [213ms, 176–420] than controls [440ms, 352–884, P <0.05] on placebo, but increased by 7 g psyllium t.d.s. [590ms, 446–1338), P<0.001]. Descending colon T1 correlated with baseline stool water content and stool frequency on treatment.

Conclusions and Inferences: MRI measurements can objectively demonstrate the mode of action of therapy targeting intestinal fluid content in constipation.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: ispaghula, laxative, relaxometry, MRI
Schools/Departments: University of Nottingham, UK > Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences > School of Medicine > Nottingham Digestive Diseases Centre
University of Nottingham, UK > Faculty of Science > School of Physics and Astronomy
Depositing User: Marciani, Dr Luca
Date Deposited: 07 Jun 2018 14:56
Last Modified: 07 Jun 2019 04:30
URI: http://eprints.nottingham.ac.uk/id/eprint/52285

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