Improving behavioral support for smoking cessation in pregnancy: what are the barriers to stopping and which behavior change techniques can influence these?: application of theoretical domains framework

Campbell, Katarzyna and Fergie, Libby and Coleman-Haynes, Tom and Cooper, Sue and Lorencatto, Fabiana and Ussher, Michael and Dyas, Jane and Coleman, Tim (2018) Improving behavioral support for smoking cessation in pregnancy: what are the barriers to stopping and which behavior change techniques can influence these?: application of theoretical domains framework. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 15 (2). 359/1-359/19. ISSN 1660-4601

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Abstract

Behavioral support interventions are used to help pregnant smokers stop; however, of those tested, few are proven effective. Systematic research developing effective pregnancy-specific behavior change techniques (BCTs) is ongoing. This paper reports contributory work identifying potentially-effective BCTs relative to known important barriers and facilitators (B&Fs) to smoking cessation in pregnancy; to detect priority areas for BCTs development. A Nominal Group Technique with cessation experts (n = 12) elicited an expert consensus on B&Fs most influencing women’s smoking cessation and those most modifiable through behavioral support. Effective cessation interventions in randomized trials from a recent Cochrane review were coded into component BCTs using existing taxonomies. B&Fs were categorized using Theoretical Domains Framework (TDF) domains. Matrices, mapping BCT taxonomies against TDF domains, were consulted to investigate the extent to which BCTs in existing interventions target key B&Fs. Experts ranked “smoking a social norm” and “quitting not a priority” as most important barriers and “desire to protect baby” an important facilitator to quitting. From 14 trials, 23 potentially-effective BCTs were identified (e.g., information about consequences). Most B&Fs fell into “Social Influences”, “Knowledge”, “Emotions” and “Intentions” TDF domains; few potentially-effective BCTs mapped onto every TDF domain. B&Fs identified by experts as important to cessation, are not sufficiently targeted by BCT’s currently within interventions for smoking cessation in pregnancy.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: Smoking cessation; Pregnancy; Behaviour change techniques; Intervention development; Theoretical Domains Framework
Schools/Departments: University of Nottingham, UK > Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences > School of Medicine > Division of Primary Care
Identification Number: https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15020359
Depositing User: Eprints, Support
Date Deposited: 19 Feb 2018 13:00
Last Modified: 26 Jun 2018 12:43
URI: http://eprints.nottingham.ac.uk/id/eprint/49857

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