The effect of tonsillectomy on the morbidity from recurrent tonsillitis

Douglas, Catriona M. and Lang, Kerry and Whitmer, William M. and Wilson, Janet A. and Mackenzie, Kenneth (2017) The effect of tonsillectomy on the morbidity from recurrent tonsillitis. Clinical Otolaryngology, 42 (6). pp. 1206-1210. ISSN 1749-4486

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Abstract

Background

Tonsillitis is a common condition with an incidence in UK general practice of 37 per 1000 population a year.1 Recurrent tonsillitis results in significant morbidity and impacts on individuals’ quality of life. This study assesses the morbidity and quality of life of adults with recurrent tonsillitis, and the impact of surgical intervention on their health state.

Objectives

To describe disease-specific and global quality of life for adults with recurrent tonsillitis 6 months after tonsillectomy, using two instruments: the health impact of throat problems (HITP) and EuroQol-visual analogue scale questionnaire. To assess the overall health benefit from tonsillectomy as an intervention using the Glasgow Benefit Inventory (GBI). To assess potential predictors of tonsillectomy benefit.

Design

A prospective, observational cohort audit of patients who have fulfilled Scottish Intercollegiate Guideline Network (SIGN) criteria for tonsillectomy.2

Setting

Secondary care, teaching hospital.

Participants

Seventy patients (57 female), median age 20 years (range 13-41).

Results

Median preoperative HITP was 47 (range 15-67), compared to 4 (0-72), (P<.001) 6 months following surgery. Median HITP difference was 39.5 (range −20 to 75). There was no significant change in global Quality of Life. Median overall 6 months GBI was 39 (−3 to 100). Patients had an average of 27 episodes of tonsillitis over a period of seven years before “achieving” tonsillectomy, significantly higher than the SIGN guidelines of three or more episodes over three years.

Conclusions

Recurrent tonsillitis causes a poor disease-specific quality of life. Patients experienced a median of three episodes per year for seven years before tonsillectomy. Following tonsillectomy, patients had a significant improvement in their disease-specific quality of life. Baseline HITP significantly improved after tonsillectomy. The results imply patients with recurrent acute tonsillitis may be experiencing undue delay

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Douglas CM, Lang K, Whitmer WM, Wilson JA, Mackenzie K. The effect of tonsillectomy on the morbidity from recurrent tonsillitis. Clin Otolaryngol. 2017;42:1206–1210, which has been published in final form at http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/coa.12850. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving.
Schools/Departments: University of Nottingham, UK > Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences > School of Medicine > Division of Clinical Neuroscience
University of Nottingham, UK > Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences > School of Medicine
Identification Number: 10.1111/coa.12850
Depositing User: Whitmer, William
Date Deposited: 13 Feb 2018 09:00
Last Modified: 15 Mar 2018 20:41
URI: http://eprints.nottingham.ac.uk/id/eprint/49744

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