Estimating the healthcare costs of children born to pregnant smokers in England: cohort study using primary and secondary healthcare data

Vaz, Luis R. and Jones, Matthew and Coleman, Tim and Szatkowski, Lisa and Tata, Laila J. and Petrou, Stavros (2018) Estimating the healthcare costs of children born to pregnant smokers in England: cohort study using primary and secondary healthcare data. Addiction . ISSN 1360-0443 (In Press)

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Abstract

Background and aims: Little is known about the long term economic consequences of smoking during pregnancy. We estimated the association between smoking in pregnancy and the costs of delivering healthcare to infants and children in England, and investigated which aspects of care are the key drivers of these costs.

Methods: We used Hospital Episode Statistics (HES) linked with Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD) data in England from January 2003 until January 2015 in children with longitudinal data for at least one, five and ten years after birth. Poisson regression provided rate ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) comparing healthcare episode rates between those exposed and not exposed to smoking during pregnancy. Linear regression was used to compare estimated costs between groups (£ sterling, 2015 prices) and generalized linear multivariable (GLM) models adjusted for potentially moderating factors.

Results: A total of 93,152 singleton pregnancies with the required data were identified. Maternal smoking in pregnancy was associated with higher primary care, prescription and hospital inpatient episode rates, but lower outpatient visit and diagnostic test rates. Adjusting for year of birth, socio-economic deprivation, parity, sex of child and delivery method showed that maternal smoking in pregnancy was associated with increased child healthcare costs at 1 year (average cost difference for children of smokers, f3: £91.18, 95%CI: £47.52-£134.83) and 5 years of age (f3: £221.80, 95%CI: £17.78-£425.83), but not at 10 years of age (f3: £365.94, 95%CI: -£192.72-£924.60).

Conclusion: In England, maternal smoking in pregnancy is associated with increased child healthcare costs over the first five years of life; these costs are primarily driven by greater hospital inpatient care.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: Healthcare costs; Smoking; pregnancy; Primary healthcare data; Secondary healthcare data
Schools/Departments: University of Nottingham, UK > Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences > School of Medicine > Division of Primary Care
University of Nottingham, UK > Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences > School of Medicine > Division of Epidemiology and Public Health
Identification Number: https://doi.org/10.1111/add.14183
Depositing User: McCambridge, Mrs April
Date Deposited: 09 Feb 2018 09:41
Last Modified: 02 Jul 2018 09:18
URI: http://eprints.nottingham.ac.uk/id/eprint/49677

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