Impact of biomass burning on ocean water quality in Southeast Asia through atmospheric deposition: field observations

Sundarambal, P. and Balasubramanian, R. and Tkalich, P. and He, J. (2010) Impact of biomass burning on ocean water quality in Southeast Asia through atmospheric deposition: field observations. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 10 (23). pp. 11323-11336. ISSN 1680-7324

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Abstract

Atmospheric nutrients have recently gained con- siderable attention as a significant additional source of new nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) loading to the ocean. The effect of atmospheric macro nutrients on marine productiv- ity depends on the biological availability of both inorganic and organic N and P forms. During October 2006, the re- gional smoke haze episodes in Southeast Asia (SEA) that resulted from uncontrolled forest and peat fires in Suma- tra and Borneo blanketed large parts of the region. In this work, we determined the chemical composition of nutrients in aerosols and rainwater during hazy and non-hazy days to assess their impacts on aquatic ecosystem in SEA for the first time. We compared atmospheric dry and wet deposition of N and P species in aerosol and rainwater in Singapore be- tween hazy and non-hazy days. Air mass back trajectories showed that large-scale forest and peat fires in Sumatra and Kalimantan were a significant source of atmospheric nutri- ents to aquatic environments in Singapore and SEA region on hazy days. It was observed that the average concentra- tions of nutrients increased approximately by a factor of 3 to 8 on hazy days when compared with non-hazy days. The es- timated mean dry and wet atmospheric fluxes (mg/m2/day) of total nitrogen (TN) were 12.72 ± 2.12 and 2.49 ± 1.29 during non-hazy days and 132.86±38.39 and 29.43±10.75 dur- ing hazy days; the uncertainty estimates are represented as 1 standard deviation (1σ ) here and throughout the text. The estimated mean dry and wet deposition fluxes (mg/m2/day) of total phosphorous (TP) were 0.82 ± 0.23 and 0.13 ± 0.03 for non-hazy days and 7.89 ± 0.80 and 1.56 ± 0.65 for hazy days. The occurrences of higher concentrations of nutrients from atmospheric deposition during smoke haze episodes may have adverse consequences on receiving aquatic ecosys- tems with cascading impacts on water quality.

Item Type: Article
Schools/Departments: University of Nottingham Ningbo China > Faculty of Science and Engineering > Department of Architecture and Built Environment
University of Nottingham Ningbo China > Faculty of Science and Engineering > Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering
Identification Number: 10.5194/acp-10-11323-2010
Depositing User: LI, Zhilin
Date Deposited: 04 Dec 2017 09:20
Last Modified: 04 Dec 2017 09:26
URI: http://eprints.nottingham.ac.uk/id/eprint/48388

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