Lung function response and side effects to rapamycin for lymphangioleiomyomatosis: a prospective national cohort study

Bee, Janet and Fuller, Sharon and Miller, Suzanne and Johnson, Simon R. (2017) Lung function response and side effects to rapamycin for lymphangioleiomyomatosis: a prospective national cohort study. Thorax . ISSN 0040-6376

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Abstract

Rationale

Mechanistic target of rapamycin inhibitors reduce loss of lung function in lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM), although their benefit varies between individuals. We examined lung function response and side effects to rapamycin in a national cohort.

Methods

Subjects were receiving rapamycin for progressive lung disease. Clinical evaluation, detailed phenotyping, serial lung function, rapamycin and safety monitoring were performed according to a clinical protocol. Lung function change, measured as FEV1 slope (ΔFEV1), was reported for those treated for 1 year or longer.

Results

Rapamycin was associated with improved ΔFEV1 in 21 individuals where pretreatment data were available (p<0.0001). In 47 treated for a mean duration of 35.8 months, mean ΔFEV1 was +11 (SD 75) mL/year, although it varied from +254 to −148 mL/year. The quartile with the highest positive ΔFEV1 had greater pretreatment FEV1 (p=0.02) and shorter disease durations (p=0.02) than the lowest quartile. Serum rapamycin level was positively associated with side effects (p=0.02) but not ΔFEV1 over 1 year. Within the first month of therapy, apthous ulcers, nausea and diarrhoea were associated with higher rapamycin levels. Acne, oedema and menstrual irregularities tended to increase over the first year of therapy. At the end of observation, the prevalence of side effects was 5% or less.

Conclusions

Rapamycin reduces lung function loss in LAM, although in some, ΔFEV1 continues to fall at an accelerated rate. Poor response to rapamycin was associated with lower pretreatment lung function and longer disease duration but not serum level. Early intervention with low-dose rapamycin may preserve lung function and reduce side effects.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: Copyright ©2017 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd & British Thoracic Society
Schools/Departments: University of Nottingham, UK > Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences > School of Medicine > Division of Respiratory Medicine
Identification Number: 10.1136/thoraxjnl-2017-210872
Depositing User: Eprints, Support
Date Deposited: 08 Nov 2017 11:29
Last Modified: 09 Nov 2017 20:12
URI: http://eprints.nottingham.ac.uk/id/eprint/47947

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