Predictors of entering a hearing aid evaluation period: a prospective study in older hearing-help seekers

Pronk, Marieke and Deeg, Dorly J.H. and Versfeld, Niek J. and Heymans, Martijn and Naylor, Graham and Kramer, Sophia E. (2017) Predictors of entering a hearing aid evaluation period: a prospective study in older hearing-help seekers. Trends in Hearing . ISSN 2331-2165 (In Press)

[img] PDF - Repository staff only until 14 December 2017. - Requires a PDF viewer such as GSview, Xpdf or Adobe Acrobat Reader
Download (1MB)

Abstract

This study aimed to determine the predictors of entering a hearing aid evaluation period (HAEP) using a prospective design drawing on the health belief model and the transtheoretical model. In total, 377 older persons who presented with hearing problems to an ENT-specialist (n = 110) or a hearing aid dispenser (n = 267) filled in a baseline questionnaire. After four months, it was determined via a telephone interview whether or not participants had decided to enter a HAEP. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were applied to determine which baseline variables predicted HAEP status. A priori, candidate predictors were divided into ‘likely’ and ‘novel’ predictors based on the literature. The following variables turned out to be significant predictors: more expected hearing aid benefits, greater social pressure, and greater self-reported hearing disability. In addition, greater hearing loss severity and stigma were predictors in women but not in men. Of note, the predictive effect of self-reported hearing disability was modified by readiness such that with higher readiness, the positive predictive effect became stronger. None of the ‘novel’ predictors added significant predictive value. The results support the notion that predictors of hearing aid uptake are also predictive of entering a HAEP. This study shows that some of these predictors appear to be gender-specific or are dependent on a person’s readiness for change. After assuring the external validity of the predictors, an important next step would be to develop prediction rules for use in clinical practice, so that older persons’ hearing help seeking journey can be facilitated.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: Hearing help-seeking; Hearing aids; Older adults; Health Belief Model; Stages of Change
Schools/Departments: University of Nottingham, UK > Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences > School of Medicine > Division of Clinical Neuroscience
Depositing User: Turrell, Jenny
Date Deposited: 07 Nov 2017 10:02
Last Modified: 15 Nov 2017 02:34
URI: http://eprints.nottingham.ac.uk/id/eprint/47908

Actions (Archive Staff Only)

Edit View Edit View