Sedentary time and markers of inflammation in people with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes

Falconer, C.L. and Cooper, A.R. and Walhin, J.P. and Thompson, D. and Page, A.S. and Peters, T.J. and Montgomery, A.A. and Sharp, D.J. and Dayan, C.M. and Andrews, R.C. (2014) Sedentary time and markers of inflammation in people with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes. Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases, 2014 (24(9)). pp. 956-962. ISSN 0939-4753

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Abstract

Background and aims:

We investigated whether objectively measured sedentary time was associated with markers of inflammation in adults with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes.

Methods and results:

We studied 285 adults (184 men, 101 women, mean age 59.0 ± 9.7) who had been recruited to the Early ACTivity in Diabetes (Early ACTID) randomised controlled trial. C-reactive protein (CRP), adiponectin, soluble intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and accelerometer-determined sedentary time and moderate-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) were measured at baseline and after six-months. Linear regression analysis was used to investigate the independent cross-sectional and longitudinal associations of sedentary time with markers of inflammation. At baseline, associations between sedentary time and IL-6 were observed in men and women, an association that was attenuated following adjustment for waist circumference. After 6 months of follow-up, sedentary time was reduced by 0.4 ± 1.2 h per day in women, with the change in sedentary time predicting CRP at follow-up. Every hour decrease in sedentary time between baseline and six-months was associated with 24% (1, 48) lower CRP. No changes in sedentary time between baseline and 6 months were seen in men.

Conclusions:

Higher sedentary time is associated with IL-6 in men and women with type 2 diabetes, and reducing sedentary time is associated with improved levels of CRP in women. Interventions to reduce sedentary time may help to reduce inflammation in women with type 2 diabetes.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: Sedentary time; Type 2 diabetes; Breaks in sedentary time; Inflammation
Schools/Departments: University of Nottingham, UK > Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences > School of Medicine > Units > Clinical Trials Unit
Identification Number: 10.1016/j.numecd.2014.03.009
Depositing User: Daunt, Wendy
Date Deposited: 19 Sep 2017 11:55
Last Modified: 14 Oct 2017 08:26
URI: http://eprints.nottingham.ac.uk/id/eprint/46470

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