Evaluating the impact of whole-class self-management and interdependent group contingency approaches on pupil engagement and disruptive behaviour

Bhana, Kamal (2017) Evaluating the impact of whole-class self-management and interdependent group contingency approaches on pupil engagement and disruptive behaviour. DAppEdPsy thesis, University of Nottingham.

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Abstract

This study investigates the efficacy of two whole-class approaches to classroom management, self-management and interdependent group contingency, in a sample of 8-9 year olds in the UK.

Phase A investigates which approach is most effective in reducing off-task and disruptive behaviours in target lessons, and in improving behaviour in general. Phase B investigates whether combining the approaches further reduces off-task and disruptive behaviour, and improves general behaviour. The research employed a quasi-experimental design. In Phase A, pupils were allocated to one of four conditions: self-management (n=30), interdependent group contingency (n=29), waitlist control receiving daily rule reminders (n=28), or a waitlist control who continued as usual (n=26). The approaches were delivered by class teachers over four-weeks. In Phase B, the class receiving self-management in Phase A, received interdependent group contingency as well, for a further four weeks. The waitlist control group continued as per Phase A.

Pre- and post-test measures for both phases were obtained through structured observations of whole-class on-task, off-task and disruptive behaviours. Teachers also completed the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) for each pupil. Findings indicated that self-management and interdependent group contingency reduced off-task behaviour, however only interdependent group contingency reduced disruptive behaviour. Combining the approaches led to no further reductions in these behaviours. SDQ data suggested that self-management, either alone or combined with interdependent group contingency, had no significant impact on general behaviour. However, interdependent group contingency alone, appeared to lead to greater general behaviour concerns.

The findings are reviewed in light of the literature with limitations acknowledged. Avenues for future research are also identified. In conclusion, this research presents tentative evidence supporting the efficacy of these individual approaches for off-task and/or disruptive behaviour. Findings that the combined approach is not efficacious and that neither approach improves general behaviour, should be interpreted cautiously given the study’s limitations.

Item Type: Thesis (University of Nottingham only) (DAppEdPsy)
Supervisors: Lambert, Nathan
Ryrie, N.
Keywords: self-management, group contingency, behaviour management, off-task, disruptive, whole class, self-regulation
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
L Education > LB Theory and practice of education
Faculties/Schools: UK Campuses > Faculty of Science > School of Psychology
Item ID: 44943
Depositing User: Bhana, Kamal
Date Deposited: 14 Dec 2017 04:40
Last Modified: 09 Jun 2018 13:20
URI: http://eprints.nottingham.ac.uk/id/eprint/44943

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