Libya and lessons from Iraq: international law and the use of force by the United Kingdom

White, Nigel D. (2011) Libya and lessons from Iraq: international law and the use of force by the United Kingdom. Netherlands Yearbook of International Law, 42 . pp. 215-229. ISSN 1574-0951

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Abstract

Those countries, including the United Kingdom, using force in Libya in 2011 have taken much greater care to ensure that their actions are underpinned by legality. This suggests a return to respect for the jus ad bellum, but as the operation against Libya unfolded it became clearer that some of the problems that undermined the legality and legitimacy of the invasion of Iraq 8 years earlier had not been avoided, which raises the question of how such operations can be kept within the strict bounds of the law.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: Libya, Use of force, United Kingdom, Responsibility to protect, Security Council resolutions, War powers
Schools/Departments: University of Nottingham, UK > Faculty of Social Sciences > School of Law
Identification Number: 10.1007/978-90-6704-849-1_9
Depositing User: White, Professor Nigel D.
Date Deposited: 03 Jul 2017 11:05
Last Modified: 16 Oct 2017 16:24
URI: http://eprints.nottingham.ac.uk/id/eprint/43890

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