A systematic review of interactive multimedia interventions to promote children's communication with health professionals: implications for communicating with overweight children

Raaff, Carol Anne and Glazebrook, Cris and Wharrad, Heather (2014) A systematic review of interactive multimedia interventions to promote children's communication with health professionals: implications for communicating with overweight children. BMC Medical Informatics and Decision Making, 14 (8). pp. 1-21. ISSN 1472-6947

[img]
Preview
PDF (Systematic review) - Requires a PDF viewer such as GSview, Xpdf or Adobe Acrobat Reader
Available under Licence Creative Commons Attribution.
Download (7MB) | Preview

Abstract

Background: Interactive multimedia is an emerging technology that is being used to facilitate interactions between patients and health professionals. The purpose of this review was to identify and evaluate the impact of multimedia interventions (MIs), delivered in the context of paediatric healthcare, in order to inform the development of a MI to promote the communication of dietetic messages with overweight preadolescent children. Of particular interest were the effects of these MIs on child engagement and participation in treatment, and the subsequent effect on health-related treatment outcomes.

Methods: An extensive search of 12 bibliographic databases was conducted in April 2012. Studies were included if: one or more child-participant was 7 to 11 years-of-age; a MI was used to improve health-related behaviour; child-participants were diagnosed with a health condition and were receiving treatment for that condition at the time of the study. Data describing study characteristics and intervention effects on communication, satisfaction, knowledge acquisition, changes in self-efficacy, healthcare utilisation, and health outcomes were extracted and summarised using qualitative and quantitative methods.

Results: A total of 14 controlled trials, published between 1997 and 2006 met the selection criteria. Several MIs had the capacity to facilitate engagement between the child and a clinician, but only one sought to utilise the MI to improve communication between the child and health professional. In spite of concerns over the quality of some studies and small study populations, MIs were found useful in educating children about their health, and they demonstrated potential to improve children’s health- related self-efficacy, which could make them more able partners in face-to-face communications with health professionals.

Conclusions: The findings of this review suggest that MIs have the capacity to support preadolescent child-clinician communication, but further research in this field is needed. Particular attention should be given to designing appropriate MIs that are clinically relevant.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: : Children, Preadolescent, Multimedia intervention, Clinicians, Health professionals, Communication, Face-to-face, Treatment, Diet, Overweight
Schools/Departments: University of Nottingham, UK > Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences > School of Medicine > Division of Psychiatry and Applied Psychology
Identification Number: 10.1186/1472-6947-14-8
Depositing User: Raaff, Carol
Date Deposited: 23 May 2017 10:19
Last Modified: 23 May 2017 20:51
URI: http://eprints.nottingham.ac.uk/id/eprint/43009

Actions (Archive Staff Only)

Edit View Edit View