Vision zero: from accident prevention to the promotion of health, safety and well-being at work

Zwetsloot, Gerard and Leka, Stavroula and Kines, Pete (2017) Vision zero: from accident prevention to the promotion of health, safety and well-being at work. Policy and Practice in Health and Safety, 15 (1). pp. 1-13. ISSN 1477-4003

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Abstract

There is growing attention in industry for the Vision Zero strategy, which in terms of work-related health and safety is often labelled as Zero Accident Vision or Zero Harm. The consequences of a genuine commitment to Vision Zero for addressing health, safety and well-being and their synergies are discussed. The Vision Zero for work-related health, safety and well-being is based on the assumption that all accidents, harm and work-related diseases are preventable. Vision Zero for health, safety and well-being is then the ambition and commitment to create and ensure safe and healthy work and to prevent all accidents, harm and work-related diseases in order to achieve excellence in health, safety and well-being. Implementation of Vision Zero is a process – rather than a target, and healthy organizations make use of a wide range of options to facilitate this process. There is sufficient evidence that fatigue, stress and work organization factors are important determinants of safety behaviour and safety performance. Even with a focus on preventing accidents these additional factors should also be addressed. A relevant challenge is the integration of the Vision Zero into broader business policy and practice. There is a continued need more empirical research in this area.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Policy and Practice in Health and Safety on 7 April 2017, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/14773996.2017.1308701.
Keywords: Zero accidents, zero harm, psychosocial factors, safety culture, prevention culture
Schools/Departments: University of Nottingham, UK > Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences > School of Medicine
Identification Number: 10.1080/14773996.2017.1308701
Depositing User: Eprints, Support
Date Deposited: 16 May 2017 09:57
Last Modified: 12 Oct 2017 22:47
URI: http://eprints.nottingham.ac.uk/id/eprint/42866

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