Exploring relationships between canopy architecture, light distribution and photosynthesis in contrasting rice genotypes using 3D canopy reconstruction

Burgess, Alexandra J. and Retkute, Renata and Herman, Tiara and Murchie, Erik H. (2017) Exploring relationships between canopy architecture, light distribution and photosynthesis in contrasting rice genotypes using 3D canopy reconstruction. Frontiers in Plant Science . ISSN 1664-462X (In Press)

[img]
Preview
PDF - Requires a PDF viewer such as GSview, Xpdf or Adobe Acrobat Reader
Available under Licence Creative Commons Attribution.
Download (2MB) | Preview

Abstract

The arrangement of leaf material is critical in determining the light environment, and subsequently the photosynthetic productivity of complex crop canopies. However, links between specific canopy architectural traits and photosynthetic productivity across a wide genetic background are poorly understood for field grown crops. The architecture of five genetically diverse rice varieties - four parental founders of a multi-parent advanced generation intercross (MAGIC) population plus a high yielding Philippine variety (IR64) - was captured at two different growth stages using a method for digital plant reconstruction based on stereocameras. Ray tracing was employed to explore the effects of canopy architecture on the resulting light environment in high-resolution, whilst gas exchange measurements were combined with an empirical model of photosynthesis to calculate an estimated carbon gain and total light interception. To further test the impact of different dynamic light patterns on photosynthetic properties, an empirical model of photosynthetic acclimation was employed to predict the optimal light-saturated photosynthesis rate (Pmax) throughout canopy depth, hypothesising that light is the sole determinant of productivity in these conditions. First we show that a plant type with steeper leaf angles allows more efficient penetration of light into lower canopy layers and this, in turn, leads to a greater photosynthetic potential. Second the predicted optimal Pmax responds in a manner that is consistent with fractional interception and leaf area index across this germplasm. However measured Pmax, especially in lower layers, was consistently higher than the optimal Pmax indicating factors other than light determine photosynthesis profiles. Lastly, varieties with more upright architecture exhibit higher maximum quantum yield of photosynthesis indicating a canopy-level impact on photosynthetic efficiency.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: 3D Reconstruction, Canopy architecture, crop productivity, Light environment, MAGIC population, Photosynthesis, Rice (Oryza spp.)
Schools/Departments: University of Nottingham, UK > Faculty of Science > School of Biosciences > Division of Plant and Crop Sciences
Identification Number: 10.3389/fpls.2017.00734
Depositing User: Eprints, Support
Date Deposited: 12 May 2017 10:46
Last Modified: 13 Oct 2017 00:39
URI: http://eprints.nottingham.ac.uk/id/eprint/42814

Actions (Archive Staff Only)

Edit View Edit View