Prediction of alcohol drinking in adolescents: Personality-traits, behavior, brain responses, and genetic variations in the context of reward sensitivity

Heinrich, Angela and Müller, Kathrin U. and Banaschewski, Tobias and Barker, Gareth J. and Bokde, Arun L.W. and Bromberg, Uli and Büchel, Christian and Conrod, Patricia and Fauth-Bühler, Mira and Papadopoulos, Dimitri and Gallinat, Jürgen and Garavan, Hugh and Gowland, Penny and Heinz, Andreas and Ittermann, Bernd and Mann, Karl and Martinot, Jean-Luc and Paus, Tomáš and Pausova, Zdenka and Smolka, Michael and Ströhle, Andreas and Rietschel, Marcella and Flor, Herta and Schumann, Gunter and Nees, Frauke (2016) Prediction of alcohol drinking in adolescents: Personality-traits, behavior, brain responses, and genetic variations in the context of reward sensitivity. Biological Psychology, 118 . pp. 79-87. ISSN 1873-6246

[img] PDF - Repository staff only - Requires a PDF viewer such as GSview, Xpdf or Adobe Acrobat Reader
Download (630kB)

Abstract

Adolescence is a time that can set the course of alcohol abuse later in life. Sensitivity to reward on multiple levels is a major factor in this development. We examined 736 adolescents from the IMAGEN longitudinal study for alcohol drinking during early (mean age = 14.37) and again later (mean age = 16.45) adolescence. Conducting structural equation modeling we evaluated the contribution of reward-related personality traits, behavior, brain responses and candidate genes. Personality seems to be most important in explaining alcohol drinking in early adolescence. However, genetic variations in ANKK1 (rs1800497) and HOMER1 (rs7713917) play an equal role in predicting alcohol drinking two years later and are most important in predicting the increase in alcohol consumption. We hypothesize that the initiation of alcohol use may be driven more strongly by personality while the transition to increased alcohol use is more genetically influenced.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: Prediction of alcohol consumption; Adolescents; Longitudinal study; Personality; Behavior; Brain responses; Genetic variations
Schools/Departments: University of Nottingham, UK > Faculty of Science > School of Physics and Astronomy
Identification Number: 10.1016/j.biopsycho.2016.05.002
Depositing User: Eprints, Support
Date Deposited: 09 May 2017 08:23
Last Modified: 13 Oct 2017 00:49
URI: http://eprints.nottingham.ac.uk/id/eprint/42623

Actions (Archive Staff Only)

Edit View Edit View