Familial aggregation of gout and relative genetic and environmental contributions: a nationwide population study in Taiwan

Kuo, Chang-Fu and Grainge, Matthew J. and See, Lai-Chu and Yu, Kuang-Hui and Luo, Shue-Fen and Valdes, Ana M. and Zhang, Weiya and Doherty, Michael (2015) Familial aggregation of gout and relative genetic and environmental contributions: a nationwide population study in Taiwan. Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, 74 (2). pp. 369-374. ISSN 1468-2060

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Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To examine familial aggregation of gout and to estimate the heritability and environmental contributions to gout susceptibility in the general population.

METHODS: Using data from the National Health Insurance (NHI) Research Database in Taiwan, we conducted a nationwide cross-sectional study of data collected from 22 643 748 beneficiaries of the NHI in 2004; among them 1 045 059 individuals had physician-diagnosed gout. We estimated relative risks (RR) of gout in individuals with affected first-degree and second-degree relatives and relative contributions of genes (heritability), common environment shared by family members and non-shared environment to gout susceptibility.

RESULTS: RRs for gout were significantly higher in individuals with affected first-degree relatives (men, 1.91 (95% CI 1.90 to 1.93); women, 1.97 (95% CI 1.94 to 1.99)) and also in those with affected second-degree relatives (men, 1.27 (95% CI 1.23 to 1.31); women, 1.40 (95% CI 1.35 to 1.46)). RRs (95% CIs) for individuals with an affected twin, sibling, offspring, parent, grandchild, nephew/niece, uncle/aunt and grandparent were 8.02 (6.95 to 9.26), 2.59 (2.54 to 2.63), 1.96 (1.95 to 1.97), 1.93 (1.91 to 1.94), 1.48 (1.43 to 1.53), 1.40 (1.32 to 1.47), 1.31 (1.24 to 1.39), and 1.26 (1.21 to 1.30), respectively. The relative contributions of heritability, common and non-shared environmental factors to phenotypic variance of gout were 35.1, 28.1 and 36.8% in men and 17.0, 18.5 and 64.5% in women, respectively.

CONCLUSIONS: This population-based study confirms that gout aggregates within families. The risk of gout is higher in people with a family history. Genetic and environmental factors contribute to gout aetiology, and the relative contributions are sexually dimorphic.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: Adolescent, Adult, Age distribution, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Cross-sectional studies, Environment, Female, Genetic predisposition to disease, Gout/epidemiology/genetics, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Prevalence, Sex distribution, Socioeconomic factors, Taiwan, Young adult, Arthritis, Epidemiology, Gout
Schools/Departments: University of Nottingham, UK > Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences > School of Medicine > Division of Epidemiology and Public Health
University of Nottingham, UK > Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences > School of Medicine > Division of Rheumatology, Orthopaedics and Dermatology
Identification Number: 10.1136/annrheumdis-2013-204067
Depositing User: Claringburn, Tara
Date Deposited: 19 Apr 2017 07:28
Last Modified: 21 Apr 2017 16:09
URI: http://eprints.nottingham.ac.uk/id/eprint/41929

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