"Our Care through our eyes": impact of a co-produced digital education programme on nurses' knowledge, confidence and attitudes in providing care for children and young people who have self-harmed: a mixed-methods study in the UK

Manning, Joseph C. and Carter, Tim and Latif, Asam and Cooper, Joanne and Horsley, Angela and Armstrong, Marie and Crew, Jamie and Wood, Damien and Callaghan, Patrick and Wharrad, Heather (2017) "Our Care through our eyes": impact of a co-produced digital education programme on nurses' knowledge, confidence and attitudes in providing care for children and young people who have self-harmed: a mixed-methods study in the UK. BMJ Open . ISSN 2044-6055 (In Press)

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Abstract

Objectives:

1. To determine the impact of a digital educational intervention on the knowledge, attitudes, confidence and behavioural intention of registered children’s nurses working with Children and Young People (CYP) admitted with self-harm

2. To explore the perceived impact, suitability and usefulness of the intervention.

Intervention:

A digital educational intervention that had been co-produced with CYP service users, registered children’s nurses, and academics.

Setting:

A prospective, uncontrolled, intervention study with pre and post-intervention measurement, conducted at a large acute NHS Trust in the UK.

Participants:

From a pool of 251 registered children’s nurses, 98 participants were recruited to complete the intervention (response rate = 39%). At follow-up, 52% of participants completed the post-intervention questionnaire, with 65% (n=33) of those reporting to have completed the digital educational intervention.

Primary Outcome measures:

Attitudes towards self-harm in CYP was measured using a 13 item questionnaire; knowledge of self-harm in CYP was measured through an adapted 12 item questionnaire; confidence in different areas of practice was measured through Likert scale responses; Self-efficacy for working with CYP who have self-harmed was measured through an adapted version of the Self-efficacy Towards Helping (SETH) scale; Clinical behavioural intention was measured by the Continuing Professional Development Reaction Questionnaire. Semi-structured interviews were undertaken with a purposive sample of participants. Results:

For those who completed the intervention (n=33), improvements were observed in knowledge (Effect size, ES: 0.69), confidence, and in some domains relating to attitudes (Effectiveness domain- ES: 0.49), and clinical behavioural intention (Belief about consequences-ES:0.49; Moral Norm-ES: 0.43; Beliefs about capability-ES: 0.42). Qualitative findings suggest participants experienced skill development, feelings of empowerment, and reflection on own practice.

Conclusions:

The effect of the intervention is promising and demonstrates the potential it has in improving registered children’s nurse’s knowledge, confidence and attitudes. However, further testing is required to confirm this.

Item Type: Article
Schools/Departments: University of Nottingham, UK > Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences > School of Health Sciences
Depositing User: Eprints, Support
Date Deposited: 23 Mar 2017 08:56
Last Modified: 13 Oct 2017 01:26
URI: http://eprints.nottingham.ac.uk/id/eprint/41499

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