Capturing residents' values for urban green space: mapping, analysis and guidance for practice

Ives, Christopher D. and Oke, Cathy and Hehir, Ailish and Gordon, Ascelin and Wang, Yan and Bekessy, Sarah A. (2017) Capturing residents' values for urban green space: mapping, analysis and guidance for practice. Landscape and Urban Planning, 161 . pp. 32-43. ISSN 0169-2046

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Abstract

Planning for green space is guided by standards and guidelines but there is currently little understanding of the variety of values people assign to green spaces or their determinants. Land use planners need to know what values are associated with different landscape characteristics and how value elicitation techniques can inform decisions. We designed a Public Participation GIS (PPGIS) study and surveyed residents of four urbanising suburbs in the Lower Hunter region of NSW, Australia. Participants assigned dots on maps to indicate places they associated with a typology of values (specific attributes or functions considered important) and negative qualities related to green spaces. The marker points were digitised and aggregated according to discrete park polygons for statistical analysis. People assigned a variety of values to green spaces (such as aesthetic value or social interaction value), which were related to landscape characteristics. Some variables (e.g. distance to water) were statistically associated with multiple open space values. Distance from place of residence however did not strongly influence value assignment after landscape configuration was accounted for. Value compatibility analysis revealed that some values co-occurred in park polygons more than others (e.g. nature value and health/therapeutic value). Results highlight the potential for PPGIS techniques to inform green space planning through the spatial representation of complex human-nature relationships. However, a number of potential pitfalls and challenges should be addressed. These include the non-random spatial arrangement of landscape features that can skew interpretation of results and the need to communicate clearly about theory that explains observed patterns.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: Urban parks; Green space; Landscape values; Urban planning; PPGIS; Biodiversity
Schools/Departments: University of Nottingham, UK > Faculty of Social Sciences > School of Geography
Identification Number: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.landurbplan.2016.12.010
Depositing User: Eprints, Support
Date Deposited: 13 Feb 2017 14:41
Last Modified: 13 Feb 2017 17:09
URI: http://eprints.nottingham.ac.uk/id/eprint/40563

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