Follow-up after curative treatment for colorectal cancer: longitudinal evaluation of patient initiated follow-up in the first 12 months

Batehup, Lynn and Porter, K. and Gage, H. and Williams, P. and Simmonds, P. and Lowson, E. and Dodson, L. and Davies, N.J. and Wagland, Richard and Winter, J.R. and Richardson, A. and Turner, A. and Corner, Jessica (2017) Follow-up after curative treatment for colorectal cancer: longitudinal evaluation of patient initiated follow-up in the first 12 months. Supportive Care in Cancer, 25 (7). pp. 2063-2073. ISSN 1433-7339

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Abstract

Purpose: To compare patient-triggered follow-up (PTFU) for curatively treated colorectal cancer against traditional outpatient follow-up (OPFU).

Methods: Questionnaires were mailed at four time points over one-year post-treatment to two prospectively-recruited cohorts: A, patients entering follow-up and receiving OPFU pre-implementation of PTFU; B, patients entering follow-up (FU) and receiving either OPFU (B1) or PTFU (B2) post-implementation of PTFU. Bi-variate tests were used to compare patient characteristics and outcomes eight months after entering follow-up (generic and cancer-specific quality of life (QoL), satisfaction). Regression analysis explored associations between follow-up model and outcomes. Resource implications and costs of models were compared.

Results: Patients in Cohort B1 were significantly more likely to have received chemotherapy (p<0.001), radiotherapy (p<0.05), and reported poorer QoL (p=0.001). Having a longstanding co-morbid condition was the most important determinant of QoL (p<0.001); model of care was not significant. Patients were satisfied with their follow-up care regardless of model. Health service costs were higher in PTFU over the first year.

Conclusions: PTFU is acceptable to patients with colorectal cancer and can be considered to be a realistic alternative to OPFU for clinically suitable patients. The initial costs are higher due to provision of a self-management (SM) programme and remote surveillance. Further research is needed to establish long-term outcomes and costs.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: colorectal cancer; aftercare; follow-up; patient triggered-follow-up; remote surveillance
Schools/Departments: University of Nottingham, UK > Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences > School of Health Sciences
Identification Number: 10.1007/s00520-017-3595-x
Depositing User: Eprints, Support
Date Deposited: 08 Feb 2017 13:54
Last Modified: 08 Dec 2017 14:20
URI: http://eprints.nottingham.ac.uk/id/eprint/40429

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