Terminal sterilization: conventional methods versus emerging cold atmospheric pressure plasma technology for non-viable biological tissues

Marsit, Nagi M. and Sidney, Laura E. and Branch, Matthew James and Wilson, Samantha L. and Hopkinson, Andrew (2016) Terminal sterilization: conventional methods versus emerging cold atmospheric pressure plasma technology for non-viable biological tissues. Plasma Processes and Polymers . p. 201600134. ISSN 1612-8869

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Abstract

Tissue products are susceptible to microbial contamination from different sources, which may cause disease transmission upon transplantation. Terminal sterilization using gamma radiation, electron-beam, and ethylene oxide protocols are well-established and accepted, however, such methods have known disadvantages associated with compromised tissue integrity, functionality, safety, complex logistics, availability, and cost. Non-thermal (cold) atmospheric pressure plasma (CAP) is an emerging technology that has several biomedical applications including sterilization of tissues, and the potential to surpass current terminal sterilization techniques. This review discusses the limitations of conventional terminal sterilization technologies for biological materials, and highlights the benefits of utilizing CAP.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: This is the accepted version of the following article: Marsit NM, Sidney LE, Branch MJ, Wilson SL, and Hopkinson A. Terminal sterilization: Conventional methods versus emerging cold atmospheric pressure plasma technology for non-viable biological tissues. Plasma Process Polym. 2016; 9999:e201600134. doi:10.1002/ppap.201600134 which has been published in final form at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ppap.201600134/abstract . This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with the Wiley Self-Archiving Policy.
Keywords: Cold plasma; Dielectric barrier discharge; Plasma treatment; Sterilization; Tissue engineering
Schools/Departments: University of Nottingham, UK > Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences > School of Medicine > Division of Clinical Neuroscience
Identification Number: https://doi.org/10.1002/ppap.201600134
Depositing User: Eprints, Support
Date Deposited: 17 Jan 2017 08:42
Last Modified: 17 Jan 2017 12:51
URI: http://eprints.nottingham.ac.uk/id/eprint/39871

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